Cleveland Clinic researchers honored for contributions to science and technology

February 24, 2011

Wednesday, February 23, 2011 - Cleveland - Three Cleveland Clinic researchers were recently named as Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), which seeks "to advance science, engineering, and innovation throughout the world for the benefit of all people."

The following individuals were recognized for their contributions to science and technology at the Fellows Forum on February 19, 2011, during the AAAS Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C.:Hamilton and Wang were elected Fellows under the AAAS's Section on Medical Sciences, and Ganapathi was elected as a Fellow under the Section on Pharmaceutical Sciences.

AAAS states: "Election as a Fellow of AAAS is an honor bestowed upon members by their peers. Fellows are recognized for meritorious efforts to advance science or its applications."

Hamilton was recognized for contributions to the understanding of inflammatory processes, particularly at the level of cytokine and chemokine gene expression and mRNA stabilization. "We continue to work toward definition of the molecular events that control the expression of inducible genes during the initiation and resolution of both inflammation and cell stress responses," Hamilton said. "Specifically these studies focus upon alterations in transcription and mRNA metabolism that can produce significant changes in levels of gene products that have important roles in coordinating the outcome of injury."

Wang was recognized for the discovery of the first gene for the lethal heart rhythm disorder Brugada syndrome, identification of mechanisms of channelopathies, and fundamental contributions to the field of arrhythmias, seizures, and sudden death. "We have identified nine genes that cause various cardiovascular and neurological diseases," said Wang, who is also Professor of Molecular Medicine at Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine and Professor of Genetics at Case Western Reserve University.

Ganapathi was recognized for contributions in the field of cancer pharmacology, molecular prognostication and anti-cancer drug development. "We continue our work on clinically active anti-tumor drugs to determine the mechanism of action and pathways of resistance, so that pharmacogenomics and targeted approaches can be exploited to maximize efficacy and reduce toxicity of chemotherapy in the treatment of cancer," said Ganapathi, who is Director of Clinical Pharmacology at the Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute and Professor of Medicine in the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine.
-end-
For more information, visit http://www.aaas.org/aboutaaas/fellows/2010.shtml.

Lerner Research Institute

Related Cancer Articles from Brightsurf:

New blood cancer treatment works by selectively interfering with cancer cell signalling
University of Alberta scientists have identified the mechanism of action behind a new type of precision cancer drug for blood cancers that is set for human trials, according to research published in Nature Communications.

UCI researchers uncover cancer cell vulnerabilities; may lead to better cancer therapies
A new University of California, Irvine-led study reveals a protein responsible for genetic changes resulting in a variety of cancers, may also be the key to more effective, targeted cancer therapy.

Breast cancer treatment costs highest among young women with metastic cancer
In a fight for their lives, young women, age 18-44, spend double the amount of older women to survive metastatic breast cancer, according to a large statewide study by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Cancer mortality continues steady decline, driven by progress against lung cancer
The cancer death rate declined by 29% from 1991 to 2017, including a 2.2% drop from 2016 to 2017, the largest single-year drop in cancer mortality ever reported.

Stress in cervical cancer patients associated with higher risk of cancer-specific mortality
Psychological stress was associated with a higher risk of cancer-specific mortality in women diagnosed with cervical cancer.

Cancer-sniffing dogs 97% accurate in identifying lung cancer, according to study in JAOA
The next step will be to further fractionate the samples based on chemical and physical properties, presenting them back to the dogs until the specific biomarkers for each cancer are identified.

Moffitt Cancer Center researchers identify one way T cell function may fail in cancer
Moffitt Cancer Center researchers have discovered a mechanism by which one type of immune cell, CD8+ T cells, can become dysfunctional, impeding its ability to seek and kill cancer cells.

More cancer survivors, fewer cancer specialists point to challenge in meeting care needs
An aging population, a growing number of cancer survivors, and a projected shortage of cancer care providers will result in a challenge in delivering the care for cancer survivors in the United States if systemic changes are not made.

New cancer vaccine platform a potential tool for efficacious targeted cancer therapy
Researchers at the University of Helsinki have discovered a solution in the form of a cancer vaccine platform for improving the efficacy of oncolytic viruses used in cancer treatment.

American Cancer Society outlines blueprint for cancer control in the 21st century
The American Cancer Society is outlining its vision for cancer control in the decades ahead in a series of articles that forms the basis of a national cancer control plan.

Read More: Cancer News and Cancer Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.