Southern insect scientists meeting in Greenville, S.C.

February 24, 2014

Hundreds of insect scientists and entomology students will be meeting in Greenville, SC next week as members of the Southeastern Branch of the Entomological Society of America (ESA) get together for their 88th annual meeting at the Embassy Suites Greenville Golf & Conference Center, March 2-5, 2014.

The meeting will feature scientific presentations, student poster and paper competitions, social events, an awards ceremony, and an insect photo salon.

In addition, students from eight universities will face off during the Linnaean Games, a lively question-and-answer, college bowl-style competition on entomological facts. The first and second-place teams will then compete on the national stage this November in Portland, Oregon at Entomology 2014, the 62nd Annual Meeting of the Entomological Society of America. The team to beat this year is Mississippi State University, who came in second place last year at the national level.

Topics will include citrus greening disease; the hemlock woolly adelgid and other forest pests; insect pests of corn, cotton, soybeans, vegetables, fruits and other crops; bed bugs, fire ants, termites and other household insects; honey bees and other insect pollinators; ticks, mosquitoes, and other arthropods that can vector diseases; turfgrass insects and more.

"This meeting will bring together hundreds of entomologists from the southeastern U.S. to discuss research on insects that affect our crops, our health, and our environment," said David Hall, president of ESA's Southeastern Branch. "We look forward to meeting in Greenville and will be available to answer any insect-related questions members of the media may have."

Journalists who would like to attend should write to rlevine@entsoc.org or call 240-696-3748 for a press pass.

The full, searchable program is available online at http://tinyurl.com/lp9t7vz

A PDF of the program book is available at http://tinyurl.com/kk24wka

For more information, visit http://tinyurl.com/llx6mx6
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The Entomological Society of America is the largest organization in the world serving the professional and scientific needs of entomologists and people in related disciplines. Founded in 1889, ESA today has more than 6,500 members affiliated with educational institutions, health agencies, private industry, and government. Members are researchers, teachers, extension service personnel, administrators, marketing representatives, research technicians, consultants, students, and hobbyists. For more information, visit http://www.entsoc.org.

Entomological Society of America

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