IRSF announces 2013 awards and implements new Translational Program

February 24, 2014

Cincinnati, (OH) - The International Rett Syndrome Foundation (IRSF) announces today ten (10) new research grants at leading global research institutions; a new Translational Research Program; and additional funding for current human clinical trials.

The funding awarded in 2013 covers the spectrum of Rett syndrome research, from basic discovery starting at the genetic level all the way to treating the girls diagnosed with Rett syndrome. Awards are not restricted by geographic boundaries, and several of the new IRSF grants are invested in researchers from Canada and Australia. IRSF remains steadfast in recruiting talented young scientists to the research bench for Rett syndrome, and welcomes three new IRSF fellows into the IRSF training fellowship program.

In an effort to move potential therapeutics past the translational research funding gap and into clinics, IRSF announces the Scout Program, a Drug Discovery Screen in a mouse model of Rett syndrome that will aggressively accelerate the testing of compounds, whether new or repurposed, through standardized preclinical studies. The Scout Program was created to replicate and confirm encouraging results stemming from studies performed in academic labs as well as testing of compounds no labs are pursuing. The Contract Research Organization (CRO) PsychoGenics, Inc. in Tarrytown, NY is the testing bed for this program and will independently test selected drugs using the set standards in preclinical studies for Rett syndrome. Outcomes from this program will provide the complementary high quality data required to move promising compounds through federal review and along the drug development pipeline toward the clinic.

"IRSF is taking the next logical step forward in developing programs that move the basic science discovery findings forward to rigorist pre-clinical trials. This is in concert with recent announcements and publications coming out of the National Institutes of Health for more rigor and replication of reported science before moving forward to clinical trials," said Steven Kaminsky, PhD, the Chief Science Officer of IRSF.

Rajat Shah, Chairman of the IRSF Board of Directors adds, "The Board is excited about the research direction that IRSF is taking. Accelerating the pace at which new drugs will move towards human clinical trials while identifying areas of research that need to be filled is of utmost importance to IRSF. Our sincerest thanks to all our families, donors, and supporters who have helped us fund this compelling research."

New Translational Research AwardsNew Basic Research Awards-Regular Research GrantsNew Mentored Training Fellowships New IRSF Scout ProgramSupplemental Funding for Current ANGEL Awards
-end-
About the International Rett Syndrome Foundation

IRSF is the leading private funder of Rett syndrome research and a provider of family support programs to those touched by Rett syndrome. Through partnerships with local, national, and international supporters, IRSF has invested more than $32 million in research leading to discoveries that allow us to test treatments for Rett syndrome in human clinical trials today. IRSF has earned Charity Navigator's most prestigious 4 star rating.

About Rett syndrome (RTT)

Rett syndrome is a rare genetic postnatal neurological disorder that occurs almost exclusively in girls and leads to severe impairments, affecting nearly every aspect of child's life: their ability to speak, walk, eat, and even breathe. The hallmark of Rett syndrome is near constant repetitive hand movements. Cognitive assessment in children with Rett syndrome is complicated, but we know that they understand far more than they can communicate to us, evidenced by their bright and attentive eyes, and their ability to express a wide spectrum of moods and emotions. To learn more about IRSF and Rett syndrome, visit http://www.rettsyndrome.org or call IRSF at 1-800-818-RETT (7388).

International Rett Syndrome Foundation

Related Clinical Trials Articles from Brightsurf:

Nearly 1 in 5 cancer patients less likely to enroll in clinical trials during pandemic
A significant portion of cancer patients may be less likely to enroll in a clinical trial due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

COVID-19 clinical trials lack diversity
Despite disproportionately higher rates of COVID-19 infection, hospitalization and death among people of color, minority groups are significantly underrepresented in COVID-19 clinical trials.

Why we should trust registered clinical trials
In a time when we have to rely on clinical trials for COVID-19 drugs and vaccines, a new study brings good news about the credibility of registered clinical trials.

Inclusion of children in clinical trials of treatments for COVID-19
This Viewpoint discusses the exclusion of children from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) clinical trials and why that could harm treatment options for children.

Review evaluates how AI could boost the success of clinical trials
In a review publishing July 17, 2019 in the journal Trends in Pharmacological Sciences, researchers examined how artificial intelligence (AI) could affect drug development in the coming decade.

Kidney patients are neglected in clinical trials
The exclusion of patients with kidney diseases from clinical trials remains an unsolved problem that hinders optimal care of these patients.

Clinical trials beginning for possible preeclampsia treatment
For over 20 years, a team of researchers at Lund University has worked on developing a drug against preeclampsia -- a serious disorder which annually affects around 9 million pregnant women worldwide and is one of the main causes of death in both mothers and unborn babies.

Underenrollment in clinical trials: Patients not the problem
The authors of the study published this month in the Journal of Clinical Oncology investigated why many cancer clinical trials fail to enroll enough patients.

When designing clinical trials for huntington's disease, first ask the experts
Progress in understanding the genetic mutation responsible for Huntington's disease (HD) and at least some molecular underpinnings of the disease has resulted in a new era of clinical testing of potential treatments.

New ALS therapy in clinical trials
New research led by Washington University School of Medicine in St.

Read More: Clinical Trials News and Clinical Trials Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.