'Comic Book Physics' examined at Jefferson Lab's March 25 Science Series event

February 26, 2003

The wild, wacky world of "Comic Book Physics" will be investigated by guest speaker Jim Kakalios, from the University of Minnesota, at Jefferson Lab's Spring Science Series event, set for Tuesday, March 25, 2003.

During this educational, entertaining event, Kakalios posits: Even superheroes must obey the laws of physics - or do they? Exactly how much force does it take to leap a tall building in a single bound and what does that tell us about Superman's home planet? Did Spider-Man accidentally cause the death of the falling Gwen Stacy when he caught her with a web? Spend the evening with Kakalios to discover what's right -and wrong - with the physics in the world of comics.

The Science Series event begins at 7 p.m. March 25 in Jefferson Lab's CEBAF Center auditorium, located at 12,000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, Va. Presentations last about one hour with a question and answer period at the end. They are free and open to anyone interested in learning more about science. Enter Jefferson Lab at its main entrance (Onnes Dr.) on Jefferson Ave. Everyone over 16 is asked to carry a photo I.D., and security guards may perform vehicle and package inspections.
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Jefferson Lab is a physics research laboratory studying quarks and gluons; it is part of the Department of Energy's national laboratory system.

DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

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