Children's Hospital 1 of 10 pediatric hospitals in US selected to study liver disease in kids

February 26, 2008

Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC has been selected to join an effort among select centers in the United States and Canada to collect and study information necessary to understand the possible causes and treatment of a destructive liver disease called primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC).

The Studies of Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis, or STOPSC, is a multi-center research effort initiated, funded and organized by The Musette and Allen Morgan Jr. Foundation. PSC is a destructive liver disease of unknown origin that occurs in both males and females and in children and adults. About one person in every 100,000 will get the disease, and currently there is no proven medical treatment for PSC.

Researchers across the country will establish a database and specimen storehouse in an effort to make the information available to other qualified researchers so future studies can be conducted. The major goal of this study is to help develop better ways to detect the disease, find out how effective current treatments are, and conduct more research studies in the future.

"This effort is so important for many reasons - most important is to better understand the disease and how to treat it. By combining all of our information and research, together, we can tackle this devastating disease head on," said Benjamin L. Shneider, MD, director of the Pediatric Hepatology Program at Children's Hospital, who is a member of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases. "At Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, we are dedicated to helping children with liver disease by exploring all treatment options -- maximizing liver function, minimizing complications and maintaining growth and development -- all to improve the quality of life for each child and family."

The study also will include adults and children with a diagnosis of PSC/autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) overlap syndrome and children diagnosed with AIH, because the clinical aspects and the possible causes of these diseases may be related. AIH is usually quite serious and, if not treated, gets worse over time. It's usually chronic, meaning it can last for years, and can lead to cirrhosis (scarring and hardening) of the liver and eventually liver failure. In addition, many individuals with PSC will also get inflammatory bowel disease.

Children's is one of only 10 pediatric hospitals selected to participate in this national study. Other hospitals include the Mayo Clinic, Children's Hospital of Denver, Children's Hospital Boston, and Mount Sinai Medical Center, to name a few.
-end-
For more information about Children's or Dr. Shneider, please visit www.chp.edu. For more information about the study, visit https://web.emmes.com/study/psc/

Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh

Related Liver Disease Articles from Brightsurf:

Fatty liver disease despite a normal weight
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba found significant differences in the clinical presentation of non-obese patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) based on their sex and body mass index.

Sobering reminder about liver disease
Alcohol's popularity and its central place in socialising in Australia obscures the dangers of excessive drinking and possible liver disease, Flinders University experts warn.

Giant leap in diagnosing liver disease
A collaborative team of Salk Institute and UC San Diego scientists have created a novel microbiome-based diagnostic tool that, with the accuracy of the best physicians, quickly and inexpensively identifies liver fibrosis and cirrhosis over 90 percent of the time in human patients.

Link between liver and heart disease could lead to new therapeutics
A newly published study of flies found that protecting liver function also preserves heart health.

Fatty liver disease is underdiagnosed in the US
According to an analysis published in Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is grossly underdiagnosed in the United States.

Possible new treatment strategy for fatty liver disease
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have identified a molecular pathway that when silenced could restore the normal function of immune cells in people with fatty liver disease.

Longevity protein SIRT6 also protects against fatty liver and fatty liver disease
SIRT6 regulates fat metabolism by activating another protein called peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR-alpha).

Fresh insights could lead to new treatments for liver disease
The fight against liver disease could be helped by the discovery of cells that cause liver scarring.

Better methods needed for predicting risk of liver disease
While blood samples can reliably identify people with a low risk of developing severe liver disease, better methods are needed in primary care for identifying people in most need of care.

Lab-on-a-chip may help identify new treatments for liver disease
Investigators have developed a 'lab on a chip' technology that can simulate different levels of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease progression.

Read More: Liver Disease News and Liver Disease Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.