Nav: Home

Estimates of sexting frequency by young people under 18

February 26, 2018

Bottom Line: A sizable number of young people under 18 engage in sexting, the practice of electronically sharing sexually explicit material, with an estimated 1 in 7 sending sexts and 1 in 4 receiving them.

Why The Research Is Interesting: There is a lack of consensus on the frequency of sexting among young people but that information is needed to inform policy and future research.

Who and When: 110,380 participants from among 39 studies identified in a review of research literature from 1990 to 2016

What (Study Measures): Frequency of sending and receiving sexts, as well as forwarding a sext without consent and having one's sext forwarded without consent

How (Study Design): This was a meta-analysis. A meta-analysis combines the results of multiple studies identified in a systematic review and quantitatively summarizes the overall association between the same exposure and outcomes measured across all studies.

Authors: Sheri Madigan, Ph.D., of the University of Calgary, Canada, and coauthors

Study Limitations: A larger sample size would yield more precise estimates and this meta-analysis focused solely on the frequency of sexting and not on factors that predict a desire to engage in sexting.

Related Material: This  article is accompanied by the editorial, "Sexting - Prevalence, Sex and Outcomes," by Elizabeth Englander, Ph.D., and Meghan McCoy, Ed.D., of Bridgewater State University in Massachusetts, and the JAMA Pediatrics Patient Page, "What Parents Need to Know About Sexting." Both are available on the For The Media website.

For more details and to read the full study, please visit the For The Media website.

(doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2017.5314)

Editor's Note: The article contains funding/support disclosures. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.

#  #  #

Want to embed a link to this study in your story? Links will be live at the embargo time http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapediatrics/fullarticle/10.1001/jamapediatrics.2017.5314

-end-


JAMA Pediatrics

Related Research Articles:


Related Research Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Moving Forward
When the life you've built slips out of your grasp, you're often told it's best to move on. But is that true? Instead of forgetting the past, TED speakers describe how we can move forward with it. Guests include writers Nora McInerny and Suleika Jaouad, and human rights advocate Lindy Lou Isonhood.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#527 Honey I CRISPR'd the Kids
This week we're coming to you from Awesome Con in Washington, D.C. There, host Bethany Brookshire led a panel of three amazing guests to talk about the promise and perils of CRISPR, and what happens now that CRISPR babies have (maybe?) been born. Featuring science writer Tina Saey, molecular biologist Anne Simon, and bioethicist Alan Regenberg. A Nobel Prize winner argues banning CRISPR babies won’t work Geneticists push for a 5-year global ban on gene-edited babies A CRISPR spin-off causes unintended typos in DNA News of the first gene-edited babies ignited a firestorm The researcher who created CRISPR twins defends...