Nav: Home

WHO report is 'major step forward' in fight against drug-resistant bacteria

February 27, 2017

A new report by the World Health Organization lays out, for the first time, which antibiotic-resistant bacteria pose the greatest risk to global health and urgently need new effective treatments.

The report was chaired by Prof. Evelina Tacconelli, executive committee member of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) in collaboration with the WHO and with input from several ESCMID experts.

The WHO Global priority list of antibiotic-resistant bacteria to guide research, discovery, and development of new antibiotics report is targeted at pharmaceutical companies, research institutions and policy-makers around the world. It is part of broader efforts to tackle the rising tide of infections that have become resistant to the drugs commonly used to treat them.

Prof. Tacconelli said: "Antibiotic-resistant infections have a major impact on patients' quality of life and are associated with high death rates.

"Modern medicine relies on antibiotics to treat infections and to prevent them in high risk patients. This includes transplant recipients or those affected by cancer, as well as in patients receiving common procedures such hip-replacements and Caesarean sections. However, the current pipeline of antibiotics is almost empty.

"This report marks a major step forward in identifying which bacteria pose the greatest risk for patient care because of a lack of effective treatments. We hope that it will drive governments and research groups working in antibiotic development to set the right research priorities that will reduce the burden of antibiotic-resistant infections globally."

The report categorizes bacteria into 'critical', 'high' and 'medium' priority groups. The bacteria listed as in need of urgent treatment solutions include Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii and Enterobacteriaceae which are resistant to multiple antibiotics and responsible for severe infections such as pneumonia and sepsis, mainly in hospitalised patients.

Resistant bacteria that also affect healthy people outside hospitals are included in the "high" priority group. These include methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Salmonella (responsible for food-poisoning) and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (the sexually transmitted bacteria responsible for gonorrhoea).

The development of the list has been achieved through an extensive review of the evidence and surveillance data from all WHO regions. It includes existing databases from guidelines such as the those developed by ESCMID [1] on reducing the spread of multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacteria in hospitalised patients .
-end-
The coordinating group of this project included other experts active in the ESCMID network: Prof. Gunnar Kahlmeter from ESCMID's European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST), and Prof. Jan Kluytmans, Prof. Céline Pulcini and Dr Ursula Theuretzbacher who are actively involved in ESCMID's study groups and are programme committee members for the ESCMID annual conference (ECCMID, European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases).

European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases

Related Antibiotics Articles:

Antibiotics promote resistance on experimental croplands
Canadian researchers have generated both novel and existing antibiotic resistance mechanisms on experimental farmland, by exposing the soil to specific antibiotics.
Why antibiotics fail
UCSB biologists correct a flaw in the way bacterial susceptibility to these drugs is tested.
Fungi have enormous potential for new antibiotics
Fungi are a potential goldmine for the production of pharmaceuticals.
Antibiotics can boost bacterial reproduction
The growth of bacteria can be stimulated by antibiotics, scientists at the University of Exeter have discovered.
Last-line antibiotics are failing
The ECDC's latest data on antimicrobial resistance and consumption shows that in 2015, antibiotic resistance continued to increase for most bacteria and antibiotics under surveillance.
Two antibiotics fight bacteria differently than thought
Two widely prescribed antibiotics -- chloramphenicol and linezolid -- may fight bacteria in a different way from what scientists and doctors thought for years, University of Illinois at Chicago researchers have found.
Preserving the power of antibiotics
News release describes efforts to address inappropriate antibiotic prescribing in emergency departments and urgent-care centers nationwide, which a JAMA study published this past May found rates as high as 50 percent for acute respiratory infections in US emergency departments.
Antibiotics could be cut by up to one-third, say dairy farmers
Nine in 10 dairy farmers participating in a new survey from the Royal Association of British Dairy Farmers (RADBF) say that the farming industry must take a proactive lead in the battle against antibiotic resistance.
Antibiotics may be inappropriate for uncomplicated diverticulitis
Antibiotics are advised in most guidelines on diverticulitis, which arises when one or more small pouches in the digestive tract become inflamed or infected.
New book on Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance from CSHLPress
'Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance' from CSHLPress examines the major classes of antibiotics, together with their modes of action and mechanisms of resistance.

Related Antibiotics Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Anthropomorphic
Do animals grieve? Do they have language or consciousness? For a long time, scientists resisted the urge to look for human qualities in animals. This hour, TED speakers explore how that is changing. Guests include biological anthropologist Barbara King, dolphin researcher Denise Herzing, primatologist Frans de Waal, and ecologist Carl Safina.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#532 A Class Conversation
This week we take a look at the sociology of class. What factors create and impact class? How do we try and study it? How does class play out differently in different countries like the US and the UK? How does it impact the political system? We talk with Daniel Laurison, Assistant Professor of Sociology at Swarthmore College and coauthor of the book "The Class Ceiling: Why it Pays to be Privileged", about class and its impacts on people and our systems.