Nav: Home

Kids want parental help with online risk, but fear parental freak outs

February 27, 2017

PORTLAND, Ore. -- Although it may come as no surprise to the Fresh Prince, kids think that parents just don't understand what it is like to be a teen in an internet-connected world and this lack of understanding may hinder the development of skills necessary to safely navigate online, according to a team of researchers.

In a study, teens rarely talked to their parents about potentially risky online experiences, according to Pamela Wisniewski, formerly a post-doctoral scholar in information sciences and technology, Penn State, and currently an assistant professor in computer science at the University of Central Florida. She added that parents and children often have much different perceptions of and reactions to the same online situations. Some of these situations may include cyberbullying, sexual exchanges and viewing inappropriate content online.

"There seems to be a disconnect between what types of situations teens experience every day and what types of experiences parents have online," said Wisniewski. "Teens tended to be more nonchalant and say that the incident made them embarrassed, while parents, even though they were reporting more low-risk events, emoted much stronger feelings, becoming angry and scared. For teens, some felt these types of experiences were just par for the course."

The researchers suggest that this disconnect may lead teens to refrain from talking about situations that may upset their parents.

"When you asked why teens didn't talk to their parents, a lot of times they mention risky situations, which they didn't think were a big deal, but they add that if they told their parents, they would just freak out and make things worse," Wisniewski said.

She added that while overreacting may curb communication, parents should avoid acting dismissive when a teen does come to them with an issue.

"When teens actually talked to their parents about what had happened, they often wanted help understanding or navigating the situation, but parents tended to misinterpret their intent, not realizing that their teens were trying to open lines of communication," said Wisniewski. "It seemed like a missed opportunity. One of the takeaways for parents, then, is that if their teen goes to them with something that they are experiencing online, parents might realize that there are likely other events that their teen doesn't come to them about. If it's important enough for the teen to bring up to the parent, it may be important enough to use as a teachable, yet nonjudgmental, moment."

The researchers, who present their findings at the ACM Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing today (Feb. 27), suggest that parental reactions -- both over reactions or under reactions -- may not just thwart teens from seeking their parents' help with a current problem, but also diminish the teens' ability to successfully navigate future online encounters that may be even more risky.

"Parental engagement can serve as teachable moments and increase the teens' resilience in safely interacting online and in social media," Wisniewski added.

A total of 136 participants -- 68 parents and their teens -- completed diaries about their online experiences during the study. The participants filled out a pre-survey, post-survey and eight weekly diary entries. Each week, parents and teens were expected to report on four potential types of online risks -- information breaches, online harassment and bullying, sexual solicitations and exposure to explicit content -- that they may have encountered during the week.

"The important point here is that the parent and the teen could both report on the same event, the teen could report on an event that the parent didn't report on and the parent could report on an event that the teen didn't report on," said Wisniewski.
-end-
Wisniewski worked with Heng Xu, associate professor of information sciences and technology; Mary Beth Rosson, professor of information science and technology and interim Dean of the College of Information Sciences and Technology and John M. Carroll, distinguished professor of information sciences and technology, all of Penn State.

The National Science Foundation supported this work.

Penn State

Related Parents Articles:

Is it ok for parents to be supportive to children's negative emotions?
New research suggests that whereas mothers who are more supportive of their children's negative emotions rate their children as being more socially skilled, these same children appear less socially adjusted when rated by teachers.
Parents with bipolar benefit from self-help tool
Online self-management support for parents with Bipolar Disorder leads to improvements in parenting and child behavior.
Stressed seabird parents think only of themselves
To see how bird families interact with each other being stressed, researchers from Vetmeduni Vienna and University of Gdansk studied parent-offspring interactions in a long-lived seabird, the little auk (Alle alle).
Parents purchase frozen dinners for more than convenience
Processed foods are higher in calories, sugar, sodium, and saturated fat than natural foods, but prepackaged, processed meals remain a popular choice for many consumers because they reduce the energy, time, and cooking skills needed to prepare food.
How parents divide their duties
Unexpected diversity in socially synchronized rhythms of shorebirds.
Should parents lie to children about Santa?
In an essay in the Lancet Psychiatry, psychologist Christopher Boyle and mental health researcher Kathy McKay question the benefits of making children believe in Father Christmas.
Are parents willing to have their children receive placebos?
Placebos are essential in any controlled clinical trial, providing a yardstick against which the test drug is measured.
Few children born to parents with serious mental illness live with both parents while growing up
A study published in the November 2016 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry found that the living arrangements of children whose parents have a serious mental illness differ from the general population.
Parents, listen up: Children keep still during prayer
Preschool-aged children, and their parents, are more likely to view the physical actions of prayer (i.e., closing eyes, folding hands) to help with reflection and communicating with God.
Looking different to your parents can be an evolutionary advantage
Looking different to your parents can provide species with a way to escape evolutionary dead ends, according to new research from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL).

Related Parents Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Anthropomorphic
Do animals grieve? Do they have language or consciousness? For a long time, scientists resisted the urge to look for human qualities in animals. This hour, TED speakers explore how that is changing. Guests include biological anthropologist Barbara King, dolphin researcher Denise Herzing, primatologist Frans de Waal, and ecologist Carl Safina.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#SB2 2019 Science Birthday Minisode: Mary Golda Ross
Our second annual Science Birthday is here, and this year we celebrate the wonderful Mary Golda Ross, born 9 August 1908. She died in 2008 at age 99, but left a lasting mark on the science of rocketry and space exploration as an early woman in engineering, and one of the first Native Americans in engineering. Join Rachelle and Bethany for this very special birthday minisode celebrating Mary and her achievements. Thanks to our Patreons who make this show possible! Read more about Mary G. Ross: Interview with Mary Ross on Lash Publications International, by Laurel Sheppard Meet Mary Golda...