Facebook 'Likes' a good indicator of quality hospital care

February 28, 2013

Los Angeles, CA (February 28, 2013) -- While those active on social media aren't shy about expressing opinions on their Facebook pages, how much do their "Likes" really reflect the quality of an organization? American Journal of Medical Quality (a SAGE journal) recently published a study that found that Facebook "Likes" were indeed an indicator of hospital quality and patient satisfaction.

"Findings suggest that Facebook offers an additional resource, beyond surveys, to gauge the attitudes of patient populations," wrote study authors Alex Timian et.al.

Researchers compared the 30-day mortality rates and hospital patron recommendations to the number of "Likes" on the hospitals' Facebook pages from 40 hospitals near New York, NY. They found that Facebook "Likes" were positively associated with patient recommendations and that a one percentage point decrease in the 30-day mortality rate corresponded with almost 93 more Facebook "Likes."

In addition to these findings, the researchers also found that teaching hospitals had a lower number of Facebook "Likes" than traditional hospitals, despite the fact that the staff at teaching hospitals is younger and predicted to be more active on Facebook. The researchers noted that this negative association of "Likes" and teaching hospitals may be a reflection of quality issues at those hospitals.

"Any hospital can start a Facebook page, but those with higher levels of quality and patient satisfaction are more likely to attract "Likes" to their page" wrote the authors. "Public health researchers and hospitals can use facebook "Likes" as a proxy for hospital quality and patient satisfaction."
-end-
Find out more by reading the article, "Do Patients "Like" Good Care? Measuring Hospital Quality via Facebook" in American Journal of Medical Quality, available free for a limited time here: http://ajm.sagepub.com/content/early/2013/01/31/1062860612474839.full.pdf+html

American Journal of Medical Quality (AJMQ) is a peer-reviewed bi-monthly journal for those practicing, conducting research, and teaching in the field of clinical quality improvement. AJMQ publishes research studies, evaluations of the delivery and management of health care, and reports on changes in the field of medical quality, utilization, and risk management, clarified with graphs and tables. This journal is a member of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE)

Impact Factor: 1.638

Ranked: 38 out of 76 in Health Care Sciences & Services

Source: 2011 Journal Citation Reports® (Thomson Reuters, 2012) SAGE is a leading international publisher of journals, books, and electronic media for academic, educational, and professional markets. Since 1965, SAGE has helped inform and educate a global community of scholars, practitioners, researchers, and students spanning a wide range of subject areas including business, humanities, social sciences, and science, technology, and medicine. An independent company, SAGE has principal offices in Los Angeles, London, New Delhi, Singapore and Washington DC. www.sagepublications.com

SAGE

Related Facebook Articles from Brightsurf:

Facebook political ads more partisan, less negative than TV
More political candidates may be shifting primarily to social media to advertise rather than TV, according to a study of advertising trends from the 2018 campaign season.

Facebook anniversaries inspire reflection, nostalgia
Posted on Facebook, milestones such as birthdays and anniversaries prompt users to reflect on the passage of time and the patterns of their lives -- and help the social media giant recycle content in order to boost engagement, according to new Cornell research.

Healthier and happier without Facebook
Two weeks of 20 minutes less time per day on Facebook: a team of psychologists from Ruhr-Universit├Ąt Bochum (RUB) invited 140 test persons to participate in this experiment.

Facebook language changes before an emergency hospital visit
A new study published in Nature Scientific Reports reveals that the language people use on Facebook subtly changes before they make a visit to the emergency department (ED).

When college students post about depression on Facebook
When college students post about feelings of depression on Facebook, their friends are unlikely to encourage them to seek help, a small study suggests.

Quitting Facebook could boost exam results
In research that validates what many parents and educators suspect, students whose grades are below average could boost their exam results if they devoted less time to Facebook and other social networking sites.

Depressed by Facebook and the like
Great holiday, fantastic party, adorable children, incredible food: everyone shows their life in the best light on social networks.

Can Facebook improve your mental health?
Contrary to popular belief, using social media and the internet regularly could improve mental health among adults and help fend off serious psychological distress, such as depression and anxiety, finds a new Michigan State University study.

How stress leads to Facebook addiction
Friends on social media such as Facebook can be a great source of comfort during periods of stress.

The dead may outnumber the living on Facebook within 50 years
New analysis by academics from the Oxford Internet Institute (OII), part of the University of Oxford, predicts the dead may outnumber the living on Facebook within 50 years, a trend that will have grave implications for how we treat our digital heritage in the future.

Read More: Facebook News and Facebook Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.