Nav: Home

Solar-to-hydrogen conversion: Nanostructuring increases efficiency of metal-free photocatalysts by factor 11

February 28, 2018

One of the major challenges of the energy transition is to supply energy even when the sun is not shining. Hydrogen production by splitting water with the help of sunlight could offer a solution. Hydrogen is a good energy storage medium and can be used in many ways. However, water does not simply split by itself. Catalysts are needed, for instance Platinum, which is rare and expensive. Research teams the world over are looking for more economical alternatives. Now a team headed by Dr. Tristan Petit from the HZB, together with colleagues led by Prof. Bin Zhang from Tianjin University, Tianjin, China, has made important progress using a well-known class of metal-free photocatalysts.

Nanolayers with large pores

Bin Zhang and his team specialise in the synthesis of polymeric carbon nitrides (PCN) that is considered a good candidate as a catalyst for hydrogen production. The PCN molecules form a structure that can be compared to thin layers of filo pastry dough: sheets of this material lie on top of each other tightly packed together. The Chinese chemists have now succeeded by means of a relatively simple two-step heat treatment in separating the individual sheets from each other - the same way that puff pastry separates into individual crispy layers in the oven. The heat treatment produced samples consisting of individual nanolayers with large pores containing different amino groups with specific functionalities.

Amino- and oxygenated groups analysed at BESSY II

Petit and his team investigated a series of these PCN samples at BESSY II. "We were able to determine which amino and oxygenated groups had been deposited in the pores", PhD-student Jian Ren and co-first author of the publication explains. They could analyse how specific amino groups pull electrons to themselves, a particularly favourable property for splitting water, and how new oxygen-based defects were formed.

Efficiency increased by factor eleven

When combined with nickel as a co-catalyst, those samples of nanostructured PCN actually exhibited record-breaking efficiency, eleven times that of normal PCN under visible light irradiation.

Photocatalytic processes at BESSY II unraveled

"This demonstrates that PCN is an interesting potential catalyst for solar-to-hydrogen production, approaching the efficiency of inorganic catalysts", explains Petit, who is a Volkswagen Foundation Freigeist Fellow. "Furthermore, this work also shows that soft X-ray spectroscopies are essential tools to unravel possible catalytically active sites on photocatalysts."
-end-


Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie

Related Hydrogen Articles:

Hydrogen energy at the root of life
A team of international researchers in Germany, France and Japan is making progress on answering the question of the origin of life.
Hydrogen alarm for remote hydrogen leak detection
Tomsk Polytechnic University jointly with the University of Chemistry and Technology of Prague proposed new sensors based on widely available optical fiber to ensure accurate detection of hydrogen molecules in the air.
Preparing for the hydrogen economy
In a world first, University of Sydney researchers have found evidence of how hydrogen causes embrittlement of steels.
Hydrogen boride nanosheets: A promising material for hydrogen carrier
Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology, University of Tsukuba, and colleagues in Japan report a promising hydrogen carrier in the form of hydrogen boride nanosheets.
World's fastest hydrogen sensor could pave the way for clean hydrogen energy
Hydrogen is a clean and renewable energy carrier that can power vehicles, with water as the only emission.
Chemical hydrogen storage system
Hydrogen is a highly attractive, but also highly explosive energy carrier, which requires safe, lightweight and cheap storage as well as transportation systems.
Observing hydrogen's effects in metal
Microscopy technique could help researchers design safer reactor vessels or hydrogen storage tanks.
The 'Batman' in hydrogen fuel cells
In a study published in Nature on Jan. 31, researchers at the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) report advances in the development of hydrogen fuel cells that could increase its application in vehicles, especially in extreme temperatures like cold winters.
Paving the way for more efficient hydrogen cars
Hydrogen-powered vehicles emit only water vapor from their tailpipes, offering a cleaner alternative to fossil-fuel-based transportation.
New catalyst produces cheap hydrogen
QUT chemistry researchers have discovered cheaper and more efficient materials for producing hydrogen for the storage of renewable energy that could replace current water-splitting catalysts.
More Hydrogen News and Hydrogen Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Uncharted
There's so much we've yet to explore–from outer space to the deep ocean to our own brains. This hour, Manoush goes on a journey through those uncharted places, led by TED Science Curator David Biello.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#556 The Power of Friendship
It's 2020 and times are tough. Maybe some of us are learning about social distancing the hard way. Maybe we just are all a little anxious. No matter what, we could probably use a friend. But what is a friend, exactly? And why do we need them so much? This week host Bethany Brookshire speaks with Lydia Denworth, author of the new book "Friendship: The Evolution, Biology, and Extraordinary Power of Life's Fundamental Bond". This episode is hosted by Bethany Brookshire, science writer from Science News.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dispatch 1: Numbers
In a recent Radiolab group huddle, with coronavirus unraveling around us, the team found themselves grappling with all the numbers connected to COVID-19. Our new found 6 foot bubbles of personal space. Three percent mortality rate (or 1, or 2, or 4). 7,000 cases (now, much much more). So in the wake of that meeting, we reflect on the onslaught of numbers - what they reveal, and what they hide.  Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.