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Patients may live longer after hip replacement, study suggests

February 28, 2018

February 28, 2018 - Hip replacement surgery not only improves quality of life but is also associated with increased life expectancy, compared to people of similar age and sex, reports a study in Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research® (CORR®), a publication of The Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons®. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.

Through a decade after surgery, patients undergoing elective total hip arthroplasty (THA) have a slightly improved survival rate compared to the general population, according to the study by Peter Cnudde, MD, of the Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register, Gothenburg, and colleagues. Dr. Cnudde comments, "Our study suggests that hip replacement can add years to life as well as adding 'life to years'--increasing the chances of longer survival as well as improving the quality of life."

Through Ten Years, Higher Survival in Patients Undergoing Hip Arthroplasty

The researchers analyzed postoperative survival rate in nearly 132,000 patients undergoing THA in Sweden from 1999 through 2012. Average age at hip replacement was about 68 years. During a median follow-up of 5.6 years, about 16.5 percent of patients died.

Survival after THA was longer than expected, compared to people of similar age and sex in the Swedish general population. In the first year, survival was one percent better in THA patients versus the matched population.

The difference increased to three percent at five years, then decreased to two percent at 10 years. By 12 years, survival was no longer different for THA patients compared to the general population.

The survival difference was significant mainly among patients diagnosed with primary osteoarthritis. This condition, reflecting age-related "wear and tear," accounted for 91 percent of patients undergoing THA. In patients with certain other diagnoses--including osteonecrosis, inflammatory arthritis, and "secondary" osteoarthritis due to other health conditions or risk factors--survival after THA was lower compared to the general population.

Not surprisingly, patients with more accompanying medical conditions (comorbidity) had lower survival after THA. Lower education and single marital status were also associated with lower survival.

Total hip arthroplasty has a proven track record in increasing mobility, reducing pain, and improving quality of life in people with hip pain and dysfunction. The researchers note "strong indications" that patients' survival after THA is improving, and that patients undergoing THA tend to live longer than a matched general population. The new findings support that impression, showing a small but significant improvement in expected survival in patients undergoing THA.

"The reasons for the increase in relative survival are unknown but are probably multifactorial," the researchers write. They note some important limitations of their registry study, including the fact that that only patients in relatively good health are selected for THA.

"While no surgeon would recommend THA to the patients just to live longer, but it is likely that the chances of surviving longer are associated with undergoing the successful operation, for patients in need of a hip replacement," says Dr. Cnudde. He notes that this could be proven only by a randomized controlled trial--which would be impossible to perform for ethical reasons. "So data gathered by registers as part of a well-conducted observational study can provide these answers, in our opinion."

The study provides new insights into the lifelong health benefits and economic value of THA, according to an accompanying CORR Insights® article by Hannes A. Rüdiger, MD, of Schulthess Clinic, Zurich. Especially as the procedure is performed in younger patients, information on the long-term rates of repeat (revision) surgery will be essential. Dr. Rüdiger writes, "As surgeons, we need more data in order to advise a patient about what one can and cannot expect from an intervention and how it will affect them for the rest of their lives."
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Click here to read "Do Patients Live Longer After THA and Is the Relative Survival Diagnosis-specific?"

DOI: 10.1007/s11999.0000000000000097

About CORR®

Devoted to disseminating new and important orthopaedic knowledge, Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research® is a leading peer-reviewed orthopaedic journal and a publication of The Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons®. CORR® brings readers the latest clinical and basic research and informed opinions that shape today's orthopaedic practice, thereby providing an opportunity to practice evidence-based medicine. With contributions from leading clinicians and researchers around the world, we aim to be the premier journal providing an international perspective advancing knowledge of the musculoskeletal system.

About the Association of Bone & Joint Surgeons®

The mission of The Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons® is to advance the science and practice of orthopaedic surgery by creating, evaluating, and disseminating new knowledge and by facilitating interaction among all orthopedic specialties. Founded in 1947 as the "American Bone and Joint Association," ABJS membership is offered by invitation only to orthopaedic surgeons who have been certified by the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery.

About Wolters Kluwer

Wolters Kluwer N.V. (AEX: WKL) is a global leader in information services and solutions for professionals in the health, tax and accounting, risk and compliance, finance and legal sectors. We help our customers make critical decisions every day by providing expert solutions that combine deep domain knowledge with specialized technology and services.

Wolters Kluwer reported 2016 annual revenues of €4.3 billion. The company, headquartered in Alphen aan den Rijn, the Netherlands, serves customers in over 180 countries, maintains operations in over 40 countries and employs 19,000 people worldwide.

Wolters Kluwer Health is a leading global provider of information and point of care solutions for the healthcare industry. For more information about our products and the organization, visit http://www.wolterskluwer.com/, follow @WKHealth or @Wolters_Kluwer on Twitter, like us on Facebook, follow us on LinkedIn, or follow WoltersKluwerComms on YouTube.

For more information about Wolters Kluwer's solutions and organization, visit http://www.wolterskluwer.com, follow us on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube.

Wolters Kluwer Health

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