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'Botox' improves appearance of facial scars in reconstructive surgery

February 28, 2018

February 28, 2018 - In patients undergoing reconstructive surgery of the face, treatment with botulinum toxin A (BTX-A, or 'Botox') can improve the final appearance of surgical scars, reports a clinical trial in the March issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).

"This study demonstrates that early post-surgical botulinum toxin injections can produce better, narrower, and flatter facial surgical scars," according to the study by XiaoXi Lin, MD, PhD, and colleagues of Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine. The results add to the growing list of clinical applications for BTX-A--beyond its cosmetic use in treating facial lines and wrinkles.

Early Botox Treatment Improves Final Appearance in 'Split-Scar' Study

The study included 16 patients undergoing facial plastic and reconstructive surgery at the authors' department over a four-month period. The patients averaged 12 years of age. Most were undergoing surgery for some type of disfiguring facial birthmark, such as a melanocytic nevus or port wine stain.

In each patient, half of the facial scar was randomly assigned to treatment with BTX-A or inactive saline (placebo) solution, injected immediately at the end of surgery. Six months later, independent plastic surgeons made measurements and rated the appearance of both sides of the scar. The scars averaged 6.74 centimeters in length, with a range of three to 16 centimeters (about one to six inches). The study included follow-up data in 14 patients.

By several measures, the final appearance of the scar was significantly better on the half treated with BTX-A. On a 0- to 10-point scale (with 0 being worst and 10 being best), the surgeon's ratings for overall scar appearance averaged 5.76 on the half treated with BTX-A versus 4.97 on the placebo-treated half.

The BTX-A-treated sides were also lower and narrower than then comparison sides. Other scar characteristics (color, pliability, and vascularity) were not significantly different.

Injection of BTX-A--best known by the brand name Botox--is widely used for treatment of facial lines and wrinkles. It is the most common cosmetic procedure in the United States, with about 7 million BTX-A injection procedures performed in 2016, according to ASPS statistics. In recent years, BTX-A has also been effectively used to treat a wide range of non-cosmetic problems as well.

How does BTX-A affect the process of scar formation? "Temporary muscular paralysis induced by BTX-A could decrease movement and stress around a healing wound," Dr. Lin and coauthors speculate. "This relief of tension may help prevent facial scar widening, hypertrophy and hyperpigmentation." They cite previous studies suggesting that BTX-A might also inhibit certain cells (fibroblasts) and mediators involved in scar.

The authors note some important limitations of their preliminary study, particularly the small number of patients included. They propose further studies comparing the effects of BTX-A on surgical scars with different injection techniques and in different locations on the face.

In a featured video on the Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery website, Editor-in-Chief Rod J. Rohrich, MD, notes that previous studies have reported the use of BTX-A to treat a variety of problems, "including chronic migraines, twitching eyelids, extreme sweating, crossed eyes, and more." He adds, "While more research is needed, this new [study] may demonstrate that early post-surgical injections of botulinum toxin can produce better, smaller, and flatter facial surgical scars."
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Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery® is published by Wolters Kluwer.

Click here to read "Effects of Botulinum Toxin on Improving Facial Surgical Scars: A Prospective, Split-Scar, Double-Blind, Randomized Controlled Trial."

DOI: 10.1097/PRS.0000000000004110

About Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

For more than 70 years, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery® has been the one consistently excellent reference for every specialist who uses plastic surgery techniques or works in conjunction with a plastic surgeon. The official journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery® brings subscribers up-to-the-minute reports on the latest techniques and follow-up for all areas of plastic and reconstructive surgery, including breast reconstruction, experimental studies, maxillofacial reconstruction, hand and microsurgery, burn repair and cosmetic surgery, as well as news on medico-legal issues.

About ASPS

The American Society of Plastic Surgeons is the largest organization of board-certified plastic surgeons in the world. Representing more than 7,000 physician members, the society is recognized as a leading authority and information source on cosmetic and reconstructive plastic surgery. ASPS comprises more than 94 percent of all board-certified plastic surgeons in the United States. Founded in 1931, the society represents physicians certified by The American Board of Plastic Surgery or The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada.

About Wolters Kluwer

Wolters Kluwer N.V. (AEX: WKL) is a global leader in information services and solutions for professionals in the health, tax and accounting, risk and compliance, finance and legal sectors. We help our customers make critical decisions every day by providing expert solutions that combine deep domain knowledge with specialized technology and services.

Wolters Kluwer reported 2016 annual revenues of €4.3 billion. The company, headquartered in Alphen aan den Rijn, the Netherlands, serves customers in over 180 countries, maintains operations in over 40 countries and employs 19,000 people worldwide.

Wolters Kluwer Health is a leading global provider of information and point of care solutions for the healthcare industry. For more information about our products and the organization, visit http://www.wolterskluwer.com/, follow @WKHealth or @Wolters_Kluwer on Twitter, like us on Facebook, follow us on LinkedIn, or follow WoltersKluwerComms on YouTube.

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