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ICES Journal of Marine Science publishes special issue on ocean acidification

February 29, 2016

Today, the ICES Journal of Marine Science publishes a special issue on ocean acidification, the most-studied single topic in marine science.

IJMS Editor-in-Chief Howard Browman opens the issue by calling for a higher level of academic scepticism to be applied to the body of work on ocean acidification. He states that, "...the majority of the literature on ocean acidification report negative effects of CO2 on organisms and conclude that ocean acidification will be detrimental to marine ecosystems. Studies that report no effect of ocean acidification are typically more difficult to publish". Therefore, studies reporting no effect ocean acidification were welcomed.

As the mechanisms underlying the biological and ecological effects of ocean acidification are still not completely understood, Browman wanted to introduce a broader perspective on ocean acidification research and invited submissions that would achieve this objective.

This special issue contains 44 contributions that address various studies on ocean acidification including methodological issues, behavioural effects, the effects of ocean acidification in combination with other environmental drivers, projecting economic impacts, and, significantly, those studies that show no effect, little effect, and/or mixed effects of ocean acidification.

ICES and Oxford University Press are pleased to make this special issue, Towards a Broader Perspective on Ocean Acidification Research, freely available.
-end-
For further information, please contact:

Celine Byrne, Communications Assistant
International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES)
Copenhagen, Denmark E-mail: celine.byrne@ices.dk
Tel. +45 33 38 67 05

For journalists: please direct requests for pdfs of articles from IJMS to Chloe Foster | chloe.foster@oup.com

Oxford University Press

Related Ocean Acidification Articles:

Ocean acidification could impair the nitrogen-fixing ability of marine bacteria
While increased carbon dioxide levels theoretically boost the productivity of nitrogen-fixing bacteria in the world's oceans, because of its 'fertilizing' effect, a new study reveals how increasingly acidic seawater featuring higher levels of this gas can overwhelm these benefits, hampering the essential service these bacteria provide for marine life.
International team reports ocean acidification spreading rapidly in Arctic Ocean
Ocean acidification (OA) is spreading rapidly in the western Arctic Ocean in both area and depth, according to new interdisciplinary research reported in Nature Climate Change by a team of international collaborators, including University of Delaware professor Wei-Jun Cai.
Unexpected result: Ocean acidification can also promote shell formation
Fact: more carbon dioxide (CO2) in the air also acidifies the oceans.
Ocean acidification to hit West Coast Dungeness crab fishery, new assessment shows
The acidification of the ocean expected as seawater absorbs increasing amounts of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere will reverberate through the West Coast's marine food web, but not necessarily in the ways you might expect, new research shows.
Landmark global scale study reveals potential future impact of ocean acidification
Ocean acidification and the extent to which marine species are able to deal with low pH levels in the Earth's seas, could have a significant influence on shifting the distribution of marine animals in response to climate warming.
Ocean acidification study offers warnings for marine life, habitats
Acidification of the world's oceans could drive a cascading loss of biodiversity in marine habitats, according to research published today in Nature Climate Change.
New study shows ocean acidification accelerates erosion of coral reefs
Scientists studying naturally high carbon dioxide coral reefs in Papua New Guinea found that erosion of essential habitat is accelerated in these highly acidified waters, even as coral growth continues to slow.
Study finds increased ocean acidification due to human activities
Oceanographers from MIT and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution report that the northeast Pacific Ocean has absorbed an increasing amount of anthropogenic carbon dioxide over the last decade, at a rate that mirrors the increase of carbon dioxide emissions pumped into the atmosphere.
Ocean acidification threatens cod recruitment in the Atlantic
Increasing ocean acidification could double the mortality of newly hatched cod larvae.
First evidence of ocean acidification's impact on reproductive behavior in wild fish
Ocean acidification could have a dramatic impact on the reproductive behaviour of fish, a new international study shows.

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