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Kavli Lectures: Computers for drug discovery, clean energy

March 01, 2016

Harnessing the power of computers to find new medicines and to explore the viability of alternative clean energy strategies will be the topics of a pair of Kavli Lectures at the 251st National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world's largest scientific society. The meeting will take place March 13-17 in San Diego.

The presentations, which will be among more than 12,500 scheduled to take place at the meeting, will be held on Monday, March 14, from 4 to 5:10 p.m. and 5:15 to 6:30 p.m., PDT, Ballroom A-C, at the San Diego Convention Center.

The first speaker will discuss how computational chemistry and physics-based models of molecular systems have the potential to improve drug discovery efforts. The second speaker will explain how using quantum computing can assist in assessing alternative clean energy approaches.
  • Rommie Amaro, Ph.D. (4 p.m.): The Kavli Foundation Emerging Leader in Chemistry Lecture
    "Computing Cures: Enabling Chemical Discovery through the Lens of a Computational Microscope"

  • Emily Carter, Ph.D. (5:15 p.m.): The Fred Kavli Innovations in Chemistry Lecture
    "Quantum Solutions for a Sustainable Energy Future"

The Kavli lecture series is a result of a collaboration between ACS and The Kavli Foundation, an internationally recognized philanthropic organization known for its support of basic scientific innovation.
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The American Chemical Society is a nonprofit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. With more than 158,000 members, ACS is the world's largest scientific society and a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

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Amaro:

Title
Computing Cures: Enabling Chemical Discovery through the Lens of a Computational Microscope

Abstract
Computational chemistry is on the cusp of a new era, in which physics-based models of molecular systems bring new and unexpected insights into drug discovery. With exascale computing power on the horizon, we are rapidly moving towards the exploration of the chemical nature of cells at unprecedented scales.

Carter:

Title
Quantum Solutions for a Sustainable Energy Future

Abstract
The current energy landscape is unsustainable? the burning of fossil fuels is causing tremendous harm to the planet, threatening the survivability of civilization as we know it. Using quantum mechanical computational methods, we explore the viability of alternative clean energy strategies for conversion of sunlight to electricity and fuels, clean and efficient combustion of biodiesel, and optimization of robust materials for fusion reactor walls.

American Chemical Society

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