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FASEB releases funding recommendations

March 01, 2016

The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB) released funding recommendations for five of the nation's research agencies for fiscal year (FY) 2017. The proposed funding levels are presented in the annual report Federal Funding for Biomedical and Related Life Sciences Research FY 2017.

The report includes the following recommendations:
  • National Institutes of Health: at least $35 billion
  • National Science Foundation: at least $7.964 billion
  • Department of Energy Office of Science: at least $5.67 billion
  • Veterans Affairs Medical and Prosthetic Research Program: at least $664.7 million
  • Department of Agriculture: at least $700 million for the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative and $1.2 billion for the Agricultural Research Service.
"Last year, Congress proved that funding biomedical research is a bipartisan priority," said FASEB President Parker B. Antin, PhD. "But to preserve America's global leadership in innovation and to make progress in understanding and fighting the diseases affecting our communities, we need a long-term commitment to sustained growth for biological and biomedical research. We urge Congress to continue the effort to strengthen our investment in American science," he said.

Nearly 50 researchers from across the country will discuss FASEB's funding recommendations with congressional offices during FASEB's annual Capitol Hill Day on March 3. Federal Funding for Biomedical and Related Life Sciences Research FY 2017 will also be distributed to senior administration officials.
-end-
FASEB is composed of 30 societies with more than 125,000 members, making it the largest coalition of biomedical research associations in the United States. Our mission is to advance health and welfare by promoting progress and education in biological and biomedical sciences through service to our member societies and collaborative advocacy.

Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

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