Nav: Home

Moffitt's Dr. Said Sebti receives NCI Outstanding Investigator Award

March 01, 2016

TAMPA, Fla. (March 1, 2016) - Said M. Sebti, Ph.D., chair of the Drug Discovery Department and co-leader of the Chemical Biology and Molecular Medicine Program at Moffitt Cancer Center, has been awarded an Outstanding Investigator Award from the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The prestigious award, which provides grant funding over a seven year term, is given to well-established cancer researchers with proven track records to encourage long-term projects of unusual potential in cancer research. Dr. Sebti's award totals $6,415,284 million.

Dr. Sebti will use the funds to further his research on novel drug therapies for KRas-mutated cancers. The proposed research is highly significant, is of high priority, and has long-term relevance to NCI's mission. With mt KRas significantly contributing to human oncogenesis and patient tumor resistance to therapy, and no anticancer drugs targeting mt KRas yet available in clinic, the NCI identified targeting Ras as a high priority and has implemented a major initiative with the ultimate goal of discovering therapies that specifically target patients whose tumors harbor mt Ras. This Outstanding Investigator Award will engage in research that tackles this challenging problem on many fronts.

"I am extremely humbled by this great honor and award from the NCI that will allow us to generate significant advances in overcoming the challenges that mt KRas poses, ultimately leading to therapies that specifically target patients whose tumors harbor mt KRas,"explained Sebti.

Dr. Sebti has been at Moffitt since 1996 and has authored more than 290 journal articles on various areas of cancer research. Recently, he has been elected as a member of the National Academy of Inventors and was recognized by Nature publishing as one of top 20 translational researchers.
-end-
About Moffitt Cancer Center

Moffitt is dedicated to one lifesaving mission: to contribute to the prevention and cure of cancer. One of the three largest cancer centers in the United States based on patient volume, the Tampa-based facility is one of only 45 National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers, a distinction that recognizes Moffitt's excellence in research, its contributions to clinical trials, prevention and cancer control. Moffitt is the top-ranked cancer hospital in Florida and has been listed in U.S. News & World Report as one of the "Best Hospitals" for cancer care since 1999. Moffitt devotes more than 2 million square feet to research and patient care. With more than 5,000 team members, Moffitt has an economic impact in the state of $1.9 billion. For more information, call 1-888-MOFFITT (1-888-663-3488), visit MOFFITT.org, and follow the Moffitt momentum on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute

Related Cancer Research Articles:

New liver cancer research targets non-cancer cells to blunt tumor growth
'Senotherapy,' a treatment that uses small molecule drugs to target ''senescent'' cells, or those cells that no longer undergo cell division, blunts liver tumor progression in animal models according to new research from a team led by Celeste Simon, PhD, a professor of Cell and Developmental Biology in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and scientific director of the Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute.
Blueprint to beat cancer launched today by World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF)
Overweight and obesity increase cancer risk. A new report published today by World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF), and presented at the European Congress on Obesity in Vienna, shows that overweight or obesity is a cause of at least 12 cancers, five more than WCRF findings a decade ago.
Oncotarget: Cancer pioneer employs physics to approach cancer in last research article
In the cover article of Tuesday's issue of Oncotarget, James Frost, MD, PhD, Kenneth Pienta, MD, and the late Donald Coffey, Ph.D., use a theory of physical and biophysical symmetry to derive a new conceptualization of cancer.
UA Cancer Center research team explores anti-breast cancer properties of soy
Genistein, a major compound in soy foods, might aid in the proper functioning of a gene that can malfunction to cause breast cancer.
Hitgen and Cancer Research UK's Manchester Institute enter license agreement in lung cancer
Cancer Research UK, Cancer Research Technology (CRT), the charity's commercial arm, and HitGen Ltd, a privately held biotech company focused on early drug discovery, announced today that they have entered into a licence agreement to develop a novel class of drugs against lung cancer.
The potential consequences for cancer care and cancer research of Brexit
Cancer leaders highlight main fears for patient care, treatment and research in a post-Brexit world.
Cancer Research UK announces Grand Challenge teams to answer biggest questions in cancer
Cancer Research UK today announces that four international teams are the first recipients of its global £100 million Grand Challenge competition, which aims to overcome the biggest challenges facing cancer researchers in a global effort to beat cancer sooner.
Huntsman Cancer Institute research holds promise for personalized lung cancer treatments
New research from scientists at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah uncovered distinct types of tumors within small cell lung cancer that look and act differently from one another.
Leading cancer research organizations to host cancer immunotherapy conference
The Cancer Research Institute (CRI), the Association for Cancer Immunotherapy (CIMT), the European Academy of Tumor Immunology (EATI), and the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) will sponsor the second International Cancer Immunotherapy Conference at the Sheraton New York Times Square Hotel (811 7th Ave., New York, NY 10019) and the New York Hilton Midtown ( 1335 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10019), Sept.
Cancer Research UK boosts efforts to overcome deadliest cancer as rates climb
CANCER RESEARCH UK has tripled its investment in pancreatic cancer, one of the hardest cancers to treat, since launching its research strategy in 2014 according to new figures published today (Wednesday).
More Cancer Research News and Cancer Research Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Warped Reality
False information on the internet makes it harder and harder to know what's true, and the consequences have been devastating. This hour, TED speakers explore ideas around technology and deception. Guests include law professor Danielle Citron, journalist Andrew Marantz, and computer scientist Joy Buolamwini.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#576 Science Communication in Creative Places
When you think of science communication, you might think of TED talks or museum talks or video talks, or... people giving lectures. It's a lot of people talking. But there's more to sci comm than that. This week host Bethany Brookshire talks to three people who have looked at science communication in places you might not expect it. We'll speak with Mauna Dasari, a graduate student at Notre Dame, about making mammals into a March Madness match. We'll talk with Sarah Garner, director of the Pathologists Assistant Program at Tulane University School of Medicine, who takes pathology instruction out of...
Now Playing: Radiolab

How to Win Friends and Influence Baboons
Baboon troops. We all know they're hierarchical. There's the big brutish alpha male who rules with a hairy iron fist, and then there's everybody else. Which is what Meg Crofoot thought too, before she used GPS collars to track the movements of a troop of baboons for a whole month. What she and her team learned from this data gave them a whole new understanding of baboon troop dynamics, and, moment to moment, who really has the power.  This episode was reported and produced by Annie McEwen. Support Radiolab by becoming a member today at Radiolab.org/donate.