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PNAS announces 6 2015 Cozzarelli Prize recipients

March 01, 2016

WASHINGTON - The Editorial Board of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) has selected six papers published by PNAS in 2015 to receive the Cozzarelli Prize, an award that recognizes outstanding contributions to the scientific disciplines represented by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS). Papers were chosen from the more than 3,000 research articles that appeared in the journal last year and represent the six broadly defined classes under which the NAS is organized.

The annual Cozzarelli Prize acknowledges papers that reflect scientific excellence and originality. The award was established in 2005 as the Paper of the Year Prize and was renamed in 2007 to honor late PNAS Editor-in-Chief Nicholas R. Cozzarelli. The 2015 awards will be presented at the PNAS Editorial Board meeting, and awardees will be recognized at an awards ceremony, during the NAS Annual Meeting on May 1, 2016, in Washington, DC.

2015 Cozzarelli Prize Recipients

Class I (Physical and Mathematical Sciences):

"Mimicking the magnetic properties of rare earth elements using superatoms," by Shi-Bo Cheng, Cuneyt Berkdemir, and A. W. Castleman Jr.

Link: http://www.pnas.org/content/112/16/4941

Class II (Biological Sciences):

"Maternal intestinal HIF-2α is necessary for sensing iron demands of lactation in mice," by Sadeesh K. Ramakrishnan, Erik R. Anderson, Angelical Martin, Brook Centofanti, and Yatrik M. Shah

Link: http://www.pnas.org/content/112/28/E3738

Class III (Engineering and Applied Sciences):

"Origami tubes assembled into stiff, yet reconfigurable structures and metamaterials," by Evgueni T. Filipov, Tomohiro Tachi, and Glaucio H. Paulino

Link: http://www.pnas.org/content/112/40/12321

A commentary accompanying this article is available:

http://www.pnas.org/content/112/40/12234

Class IV (Biomedical Sciences):

"Evidence for α-synuclein prions causing multiple system atrophy in humans with parkinsonism," by Stanley B. Prusiner, Amanda L. Woerman, Daniel A. Mordes, Joel C. Watts, Ryan Rampersaud, David B. Berry, Smita Patel, Abby Oehler, Jennifer K. Lowe, Stephanie N. Kravitz, Daniel H. Geschwind, David V. Glidden, Glenda M. Halliday, Lefkos T. Middleton, Steve M. Gentleman, Lea T. Grinberg, and Kurt Giles

Link: http://www.pnas.org/content/112/38/E5308

A commentary accompanying this article is available:

http://www.pnas.org/content/112/38/11748

Class V (Behavioral and Social Sciences):

"Rising morbidity and mortality in midlife among white non-Hispanic Americans in the 21st century," by Anne Case and Angus Deaton

Link: http://www.pnas.org/content/112/49/15078

A commentary accompanying this article is available:

http://www.pnas.org/content/112/49/15006

Class VI (Applied Biological, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences):

"Low-cost solution to the grid reliability problem with 100% penetration of intermittent wind, water, and solar for all purposes," by Mark Z. Jacobson, Mark A. Delucchi, Mary A. Cameron, and Bethany A. Frew

Link: http://www.pnas.org/content/112/49/15060
-end-
PNAS is one of the world's most-cited multidisciplinary scientific journals. It covers the biological, physical, and social sciences and mathematics and publishes cutting-edge research reports, commentaries, reviews, perspectives, colloquium papers, and actions of the Academy. PNAS is published daily online in PNAS Early Edition and in weekly issues. Newly published papers are listed at http://www.pnas.org/content/early/recent.

For more information about PNAS or the NAS, visit http://www.pnas.org or http://www.nasonline.org.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

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