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Emergency departments face considerable costs related to long-term urinary catheters

March 01, 2016

Problems with long-term urinary catheters create a considerable demand on emergency departments and are very costly to healthcare systems, according to a new study from South East London.

Patients with long-term urinary catheters should have access to community nursing services, but most patients in this study had minimal community nurse support. "More than 80% of patients attended the emergency department for a simple catheter problem, and only 14% actually saw a community nurse beforehand," said June Tay, lead author of the BJU International article.

The findings indicate that better strategies are needed so that issues with long-term urinary catheters can be addressed and managed effectively in the community.
-end-
Citation: Tay, L. J., Lyons, H., Karrouze, I., Taylor, C., Khan, A. A. and Thompson, P. M. (2016), Impact of the lack of community urinary catheter care services on the Emergency Department. BJU International. doi: 10.1111/bju.13430

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