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Was author of famed 'Gray's Anatomy' textbook a plagiarist?

March 01, 2016

A new survey of historical evidence demonstrates that Henry Gray plagiarized parts of the first edition of his book, Gray's Anatomy, the famed textbook of human anatomy that was initially published in 1858 and is currently in its 41st edition.

Included in the evidence are traits of character that exhibit Gray's inclination towards garnering credit - intellectual and financial - to himself, to others' cost.

"It was sad for Gray that he didn't live long enough to acquire generosity. He'd stood on other people's shoulders, but was in too much of a hurry to say thanks," said Dr. Ruth Richardson, author of the Clinical Anatomy article that looks into the issue.
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Citation: Richardson, R. (2016), Henry Gray, plagiarist. Clin. Anat., 29: 135-139. doi: 10.1002/ca.22681

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