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Media can register now for ESTRO 36 - Europe's largest congress on radiation oncology

March 01, 2017

Registration has now opened for journalists for ESTRO 36 - Europe's largest congress on radiation oncology, organised by the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO).

ESTRO 36 takes place at the Reed Messe Vienna GmbH, Congress Centre, Messeplatz 1, A-1021 Vienna, Austria, 5 - 9 May 2017. Registration is free for journalists on provision of bona fide press credentials.

The ESTRO 36 congress will feature new research results in clinical radiation oncology, radiobiology, physics, technology, patient care, radiation therapy and brachytherapy, presented by top doctors, scientists, radiation therapists and cancer nurses from all over the world, working together for the benefit of cancer patients.

The congress is expected to attract 5,000 delegates from more than 80 countries.

The congress will cover the entire spectrum of radiotherapy, both external beam and internal beam with brachytherapy, and highlight what is new across fields as diverse as:
  • state-of-the-art breast brachytherapy
  • combination radiotherapy and targeted agents
  • radiotherapy and health economics
  • how to select the right patients for proton therapy in Europe
  • emerging technologies in particle therapy
  • long-term effects in cancer survivors
  • targeted therapy, stem cells, and normal tissue toxicity
-end-
The ESTRO web site has full details about ESTRO 36, including the scientific programme, venue, accommodation, media registration etc.

Twitter hashtag: #ESTRO36

European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO)

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