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27th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases

March 01, 2017

Media can register now for the 27th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Vienna, Saturday 22 April to Tuesday 25 April 2017. Registration for bona fide journalists is free.

The world's leading experts will come together to discuss the latest developments in infectious diseases, infection control and clinical microbiology at the largest, most comprehensive and most influential conference combining these topics: http://www.eccmid.org

With almost 12,000 attendees, the scientific programme includes symposia, keynote lectures, meet-the-expert sessions and workshops. Renowned speakers from around the world will present the latest cutting-edge research as well as overviews of recent developments. Topics will include viral and bacterial infection and disease, antimicrobial resistance, diagnostics, new antimicrobial agents and stewardship, fungal infection and disease, parasitic diseases and global health, healthcare-associated and hospital-acquired infections and infection control, immunology, vaccines and much more.

In a world of global travel, shifting populations, the rise in new infections and drug-resistant infections, this congress plays a vital role in sharing the very latest developments in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of infectious diseases.

In particular, the late-breaking presentations, where researchers submit their abstracts after the normal deadline for the congress, will offer discussions on the very latest, up-to-the-minute developments with the potential to change medical practice and patient care.

ESCMID (the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases - the organizer of the congress) welcomes the interest of the press and is happy to provide full assistance to journalists attending ECCMID 2017 in Vienna, or those using the congress website as a resource in their coverage of clinical microbiology and infectious disease.
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European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases

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