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New statistics reveal the shape of plastic surgery

March 01, 2018

New data released by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) shows continued growth in cosmetic procedures over the last year. According to the annual plastic surgery procedural statistics, there were 17.5 million surgical and minimally-invasive cosmetic procedures performed in the United States in 2017, a 2 percent increase over 2016.

The statistics also reveal Americans are turning to new and innovative ways to shape their bodies, as minimally-invasive cosmetic procedures have increased nearly 200% since 2000.

Top 5 Cosmetic Surgical and Minimally-Invasive Procedures

Minimally-invasive cosmetic procedures grew at a slightly higher rate than surgical procedures in 2017. While three of the top-five surgical procedures focused on the body, the top minimally-invasive procedures focused on the face.

Of the nearly 1.8 million cosmetic surgical procedures performed in 2017, the top 5 were:
  • Breast augmentation (300,378 procedures, up 3 percent from 2016)
  • Liposuction (246,354 procedures, up 5 percent from 2016)
  • Nose reshaping (218,924 procedures, down 2 percent from 2016)
  • Eyelid surgery (209,571 procedures, approximately the same as 2016)
  • Tummy tuck (129,753 procedures, up 2 percent from 2016


Among the 15.7 million cosmetic minimally-invasive procedures performed in 2017, the top 5 were:
  • Botulinum Toxin Type A (7.23 million procedures, up 2 percent from 2016)
  • Soft Tissue Fillers (2.69 million procedures, up 3 percent from 2016)
  • Chemical Peel (1.37 million procedures, up 1 percent since 2016)
  • Laser hair removal (1.1 million procedures, down 2 percent from 2016)
  • Microdermabrasion (740,287 procedures, down 4% from 2016)


Spike in Breast Reductions

After a 4% decline in 2016, there was a dramatic spike in breast reduction surgeries in 2017, increasing by 11%. Breast reduction, also known as reduction mammaplasty, is a procedure to remove excess breast fat, glandular tissue and skin to achieve a breast size in proportion with your body.

"Breast reductions are consistently reported as one of the highest patient satisfaction procedures because it positively affects a woman's quality of life. It addresses both functional and aesthetic concerns," said ASPS President Jeffrey E. Janis, MD.

A Comeback Story For Tummy Tucks

Tummy tucks, which dropped from the top five most popular cosmetic surgical procedures in 2016, have rebounded their way back into the top five in 2017. There were over 2,000 more tummy tuck procedures in 2017 than there were in 2016.

"An improved abdominal contour is something that many of us strive for, but for some patients, that may not be attainable through diet and exercise alone," said Janis. "Age, pregnancy and significant weight changes can impact both the skin and underlying muscle. Tummy tucks performed by a board-certified plastic surgeon remove excess fat and skin and, in most cases, restore weakened or separated muscles to create an improved abdominal profile."

Body Sculpting and Non-Invasive Fat Procedures Boom

More people are choosing to shape different parts of their bodies using ultrasound, radio frequency, infrared light, vacuum massage and injectable medication to reduce fat cells. Non-invasive procedures to eliminate fat and tighten the skin are gaining popularity, with the fastest growing procedure - cellulite treatments - up nearly 20% over last year.

"Unwanted fat is something that affects so many Americans," said Janis. "Plastic surgeons are able to give patients more options than ever before for fat elimination or redistribution. Patients appreciate having options, especially if they can act as maintenance steps while they decide if getting something more extensive down the line will be right for them."

Current non-invasive fat reduction and skin tightening procedures continue to gain popularity:
  • Non-invasive fat reduction procedures that use special technology to "freeze" away fat without surgery increased 7%
  • Non-surgical cellulite treatments that use lasers to eliminate fat increased 19% (up 55% since 2000)
  • Non-invasive skin tightening procedures that target fat and tighten sagging areas increased 9%
-end-
About the ASPS Annual Procedural Statistics

ASPS members may report procedural information through the first online national database for plastic surgery procedures, Tracking Operations and Outcomes for Plastic Surgeons (TOPS). This data, combined with an annual survey sent to American Board of Medical Specialties' certified physicians most likely to perform these procedures, results in the most comprehensive census on plastic surgery.

About ASPS

The American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) is the world's largest organization of board-certified plastic surgeons. Representing more than 7,000 member surgeons, the Society is recognized as a leading authority and information source on aesthetic and reconstructive plastic surgery. ASPS comprises almost 95 percent of all board-certified plastic surgeons in the United States. Founded in 1931, the Society represents physicians certified by The American Board of Plastic Surgery or The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. ASPS advances quality care to plastic surgery patients by encouraging high standards of training, ethics, physician practice and research in plastic surgery.

The American Society of Plastic Surgeons

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