Nav: Home

Regular walking may protect against heart failure post menopause

March 01, 2018

WASHINGTON (March 1, 2018) -- Walking for at least 40 minutes several times per week at an average to fast pace is associated with a near 25 percent drop in the risk of heart failure among post-menopausal women, according to new research being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 67th Annual Scientific Session. The benefit appears to be consistent regardless of a woman's body weight or whether she engages in other forms of exercise besides walking.

About 6.5 million adults have heart failure, a condition in which the heart becomes too weak to pump enough blood to meet the body's needs. The risk of heart failure rises with age; women 75-84 years of age are three times as likely to have heart failure compared with women 65-74 years old.

"We already know that physical activity lowers the risk of heart failure, but there may be a misconception that simply walking isn't enough," said Somwail Rasla, MD, a cardiology fellow at Saint Vincent Hospital, who conducted the study during his residency at Brown University. "Our analysis shows walking is not only an accessible form of exercise but almost equal to all different types of exercise that have been studied before in terms of lowering heart failure risk. Essentially, we can reach a comparable energetic expenditure through walking that we gain from other types of physical activity."

Because walking can be done any time and doesn't require special equipment, the results put meaningful physical activity within reach for older women who may be hesitant to join a gym or begin a new workout routine.

The study, which analyzed walking behavior and health outcomes among 89,000 women over a more than 10-year period, is the first to examine, in detail, the benefits of walking by parsing the effects of walking frequency, duration and speed. It is also the first to specifically focus on the risk of heart failure among women over age 50.

The research is based on an analysis of data from the Women's Health Initiative, a large study funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute that collected data about women's habits and health outcomes from 1991-2005. Participants were between 50 and 79 years of age at enrollment. Rasla and colleagues extracted data for women who, at baseline, were able to walk at least one block and did not have heart failure, coronary artery disease or cancer.

Based on information from participant questionnaires, the women's walking behavior was categorized according to frequency, duration and speed. Researchers also assessed the women's overall energy expenditure from walking by combining all three of these variables into a calculation known as Metabolic Equivalent of Task (MET). Those in the highest tertile for MET per week were 25 percent less likely to develop heart failure compared with those in the lowest tertile.

The findings suggest walking frequency, duration and speed each contribute about equally to this overall benefit. Women who walked at least twice a week had a 20 to 25 percent lower risk of heart failure than those who walked less frequently. Those who walked for 40 minutes or more at a time had a 21 to 25 percent lower risk than those taking shorter walks. Women walking at an average or fast pace showed a 26 and 38 percent lower risk of heart failure, respectively, compared with women who walked at a casual pace.

Researchers said the results were consistent across different age categories, ethnicities and baseline body weight in post-menopausal women, suggesting the findings can be generalized to apply to most women above 50 years old.

"We actually looked at women with four different categories of body mass index (BMI) and found the same inverse relationship between walking behavior and the risk of heart failure," Rasla said. "The results show that even obese and overweight women can still benefit from walking to decrease their risk of heart failure."

The analysis accounted for a variety of heart disease risk factors, such as smoking, alcohol use, family and medical history, use of hormones and overall amount of physical activity. Walking behavior was assessed based on self-reporting by participants during the study. Researchers were unable to account for the potential effects of exercise or walking habits earlier in life.

Rasla will present the study, "Association of Walking Pace, Walking Frequency and Duration and Joint Effects on the Risk of Heart Failure in Post-Menopausal Women," on Monday, March 12 at 9:45 a.m. ET in Prevention Moderated Poster Theater, Poster Hall A/B.
-end-
The ACC's Annual Scientific Session, which will take place March 10-12 in Orlando, brings together cardiologists and cardiovascular specialists from around the world to share the newest discoveries in treatment and prevention. Follow @ACCinTouch, @ACCMediaCenter and #ACC18 for the latest news from the meeting. The American College of Cardiology is a 52,000-member medical society that is the professional home for the entire cardiovascular care team. The mission of the College is to transform cardiovascular care and to improve heart health. The ACC leads in the formation of health policy, standards and guidelines. The College operates national registries to measure and improve care, offers cardiovascular accreditation to hospitals and institutions, provides professional medical education, disseminates cardiovascular research and bestows credentials upon cardiovascular specialists who meet stringent qualifications.

Rasla will be available to the media in an embargoed web briefing on Tuesday, February 27 at 2:00 p.m. ET.

American College of Cardiology

Related Heart Failure Articles:

Transcendental Meditation prevents abnormal enlargement of the heart, reduces chronic heart failure
A randomized controlled study recently published in the Hypertension issue of Ethnicity & Disease found the Transcendental Meditation (TM) technique helps prevent abnormal enlargement of the heart compared to health education (HE) controls.
Beta blocker use identified as hospitalization risk factor in 'stiff heart' heart failure
A new study links the use of beta-blockers to heart failure hospitalizations among those with the common 'stiff heart' heart failure subtype.
Type 2 diabetes may affect heart structure and increase complications and death among heart failure patients of Asian ethnicity
The combination of heart failure and Type 2 diabetes can lead to structural changes in the heart, poorer quality of life and increased risk of death, according to a multi-country study in Asia.
Preventive drug therapy may increase right-sided heart failure risk in patients who receive heart devices
Patients treated preemptively with drugs to reduce the risk of right-sided heart failure after heart device implantation may experience the opposite effect and develop heart failure and post-operative bleeding more often than patients not receiving the drugs.
How the enzyme lipoxygenase drives heart failure after heart attacks
Heart failure after a heart attack is a global epidemic leading to heart failure pathology.
Novel heart pump shows superior outcomes in advanced heart failure
Severely ill patients with advanced heart failure who received a novel heart pump -- the HeartMate 3 left ventricular assist device (LVAD) -- suffered significantly fewer strokes, pump-related blood clots and bleeding episodes after two years, compared with similar patients who received an older, more established pump, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session.
NSAID impairs immune response in heart failure, worsens heart and kidney damage
Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, are widely known as pain-killers and can relieve pain and inflammation.
Heart cell defect identified as possible cause of heart failure in pregnancy
A new Tel Aviv University study reveals that one of the possible primary causes of heart failure in pregnant women is a functional heart cell defect.
In heart failure, a stronger heart could spell worse symptoms
Patients with stronger-pumping hearts have as many physical and cognitive impairments as those with weaker hearts, suggesting the need for better treatment.
Patients with common heart failure more likely to have lethal heart rhythms
New Smidt Heart Institute Research shows that patients with Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction (HFpEF) are more likely to have lethal heart rhythms.
More Heart Failure News and Heart Failure Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Uncharted
There's so much we've yet to explore–from outer space to the deep ocean to our own brains. This hour, Manoush goes on a journey through those uncharted places, led by TED Science Curator David Biello.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#556 The Power of Friendship
It's 2020 and times are tough. Maybe some of us are learning about social distancing the hard way. Maybe we just are all a little anxious. No matter what, we could probably use a friend. But what is a friend, exactly? And why do we need them so much? This week host Bethany Brookshire speaks with Lydia Denworth, author of the new book "Friendship: The Evolution, Biology, and Extraordinary Power of Life's Fundamental Bond". This episode is hosted by Bethany Brookshire, science writer from Science News.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dispatch 1: Numbers
In a recent Radiolab group huddle, with coronavirus unraveling around us, the team found themselves grappling with all the numbers connected to COVID-19. Our new found 6 foot bubbles of personal space. Three percent mortality rate (or 1, or 2, or 4). 7,000 cases (now, much much more). So in the wake of that meeting, we reflect on the onslaught of numbers - what they reveal, and what they hide.  Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.