Nav: Home

Syrian academics face danger, limited options

March 02, 2016

The Syrian civil war, which began in 2011, continues to result in death, destruction and displacement. The country's higher education system has suffered dramatically, too. An article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, explores some of the struggles that academics in Syria face today.

Naomi Lubick, a C&EN correspondent, interviewed Kassem Alsayed Mahmoud, a native Syrian who was forced to join the military despite his position as a food sciences professor at a Syrian university. Being a student or academic does not offer protection against conscription in the country. He ultimately fled the war and returned to Western Europe, where he had earned his degrees.

Many other faculty members and students face dangers on their commutes to school and, once they arrive, find very few resources at their disposal - electricity and Internet connectivity are unreliable. Even campus dorms are no longer safe spaces, as they are currently used as housing for some of the 8 million internally displaced Syrians. Now that many men have been conscripted into the military, women are a majority at many campuses. Others have fled: It is estimated that tens of thousands of students and faculty members have left the war-torn country.
-end-
The American Chemical Society is a nonprofit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. With more than 158,000 members, ACS is the world's largest scientific society and a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

To automatically receive news releases from the American Chemical Society, contact newsroom@acs.org.Follow us: TwitterFacebook

American Chemical Society

Related Academics Articles:

How 'The Gruffalo' helped academics boost youngsters' motor skills and language ability
Combining movement and storytelling activities boosts pre-school children's key motor skills and language ability, according to Coventry University experts who used bestselling book 'The Gruffalo' during their research.
Public confused by climate change messages
Experts, charities, the media and government confuse the public by speaking 'different languages' on climate change, a new study says.
Are we educating educators about academic integrity?
A study by Swansea University researchers has found that student academic integrity is not a core concept taught to academics in Higher Education.
Academics call for Parliament to tackle the privatization of NHS
A bill to prevent the privatization of NHS services and to reinstate the NHS in England, supported and written by Newcastle University academics, is scheduled to be debated today.
Academics urged to strengthen ties to US peers in face of Trump travel ban
In the face of the Trump travel ban, academics must strengthen, rather than sever, ties to the United States, argues Dr.
Watching birds near your home is good for your mental health -- official
People living in neighborhoods with more birds, shrubs and trees are less likely to suffer from depression, anxiety and stress, according to research by academics at the University of Exeter, the British Trust for Ornithology and the University of Queensland.
Move over Bear Grylls! Academics build ultimate solar-powered water purifier
You've seen Bear Grylls turn foul water into drinking water with little more than sunlight and plastic.
Racism still rife against black and minority ethnic teachers in England
A University of Huddersfield professor has developed a theory that black and minority ethnic (BME) teachers and academics in England depend on 'white sanction' in order to fulfill their potential.
Abstract submissions now open for aging conference
The call for abstracts opens Friday, Sept. 30, for the second annual Optimal Aging Conference, hosted by the University of Louisville Institute for Sustainable Health & Optimal Aging in partnership with the Kentucky Association for Gerontology.
Trauma patient deaths peak at 2 weeks
New research shows patients could be more likely to die two to three weeks after lower severity trauma.

Related Academics Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Jumpstarting Creativity
Our greatest breakthroughs and triumphs have one thing in common: creativity. But how do you ignite it? And how do you rekindle it? This hour, TED speakers explore ideas on jumpstarting creativity. Guests include economist Tim Harford, producer Helen Marriage, artificial intelligence researcher Steve Engels, and behavioral scientist Marily Oppezzo.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#524 The Human Network
What does a network of humans look like and how does it work? How does information spread? How do decisions and opinions spread? What gets distorted as it moves through the network and why? This week we dig into the ins and outs of human networks with Matthew Jackson, Professor of Economics at Stanford University and author of the book "The Human Network: How Your Social Position Determines Your Power, Beliefs, and Behaviours".