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Youth exposure to tobacco outlets and cigarette smoking

March 02, 2020

A new study led by researchers at the Prevention Research Center of the Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation explores these questions using real time data from 100 youth participants from 16-20 years old to assess the effect of exposure to tobacco outlets on same-day smoking and the number of cigarettes consumed.

Across two weeks, participants carried GPS-enabled smartphones that recorded their location at one-minute intervals and invited youth to respond to brief daily surveys.

The measurements focused on any cigarette smoking by youth on a given day, the number of cigarettes smoked, the number of tobacco outlets within 100m of activity space, the number of minutes participants spent within 100m of outlets each day, and demographic characteristics.

The results indicate that day-to-day exposure to tobacco outlets within youth activity space -- or the broader environments where youths spend their time -- is not related to whether a youth smokes a cigarette on a given day, but it is associated with the number of cigarettes smoked on that day.

Says lead author, Dr. Sharon Lipperman-Kreda: "The results of this study go beyond previous research and highlight the importance of policies to regulate youth exposure to tobacco outlets beyond residential or school neighborhoods. Regulating exposure to outlets limits access and availability of cigarettes through retail outlets for the youth population and, in particular, for youth in socially disadvantaged areas who encounter high exposure to tobacco outlets in their daily activity spaces."
-end-
Source: Lipperman?Kreda, Sharon, Laura J. Finan, Sarah D. Kowitt, Joel W. Grube, Melissa Abadi, Anna Balassone, and Emily Kaner. "Youth Daily Exposure to Tobacco Outlets and Cigarette Smoking Behaviors: Does Exposure within Activity Space Matter?." Addiction (2020).

This research was supported by grant 25IR-0029 from the California Tobacco-Related Disease Research Program and grant P60-AA006282 from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism of the National Institutes of Health.

PIRE is an independent, nonprofit organization merging scientific knowledge and proven practice to create solutions that improve the health, safety and well-being of individuals, communities, and nations around the world. http://www.pire.org

The Prevention Research Center (PRC) of PIRE is one of 16 centers sponsored by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), of the National Institutes of Health, and is the only one that specializes in prevention. PRC's focus is on conducting research to better understand the social and physical environments that influence individual behavior that lead to alcohol and drug misuse. http://www.prev.org

The Resource Link for Community Action provides information and practical guidance to state and community agencies and organizations, policy makers, and members of the public who are interested in combating alcohol and other drug abuse and misuse. https://prev.org/community-action/

Facebook: facebook.com/PrevResources
Twitter: twitter.com/PrevResources
LinkedIn: linkedin.com/company/PrevResources

If you would like more information about this topic, please call Sue Thomas at 831.429.4084 or email her at thomas.pire.org

Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation

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