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Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, SIR Foundation present awards

March 03, 2015

ATLANTA--The Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (JVIR)--the Society of Interventional Radiology's peer-reviewed scientific journal--presented the 2014 JVIR Editor's Best awards during the March 3 general session of the SIR Annual Scientific Meeting, Feb. 28-March 5 in Atlanta. The annual awards, supported by SIR Foundation, are made after a comprehensive review of all papers submitted to JVIR during 2014.

Shin Jae Lee, M.D., Severance Hospital, Seoul, Korea, was honored for the outstanding clinical research paper for "Comparison of the efficacy of covered versus uncovered metallic stents in treating inoperable malignant common bile duct obstruction: A randomized trial." JVIR Editor-in-chief Ziv J Haskal, M.D., FSIR, noted the paper's importance saying, "Advances in chemotherapy and radiation have prolonged survival in inoperable malignant biliary obstruction. Long-term stent biliary patency however, is an important issue and Lee's prospective controlled study demonstrated nearly double the durability of covered stents for relief of the obstruction--an advance that resulted in reduced reinterventions and improvements in the patients' quality of life."

Katrin Fuchs, Pharm.D., University of Geneva, Switzerland, accepted the award for outstanding laboratory investigation for "Drug-eluting beads loaded with anti-angiogenic agents for chemoembolization: In vitro sunitinib loading, release and in vivo pharmacokinetics in an animal model." Haskal, a professor with the department of radiology and medical imaging at the University of Virginia Health System in Charlottesville, said, "Fuchs wrote about adding drug-releasing particles with a new class of agents that inhibit tumor growth, making the use of drug-eluting embolics in transarterial chemoembolization better." He underscored the significance, noting that suppressing tumor growth with this class of important agents has the added benefit of limiting overall toxicity and side effects.

Haskal also recognized the authors of an additional nine clinical and seven laboratory papers for their contributions.

More information about the Society of Interventional Radiology, finding an interventional radiologist in your area, minimally invasive treatments, and the Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology can be found online at sirweb.org.
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About the Society of Interventional Radiology Foundation

SIR Foundation is a scientific foundation dedicated to fostering research and education in interventional radiology for the purposes of advancing scientific knowledge, increasing the number of skilled investigators in interventional radiology and developing innovative therapies that lead to improved patient care and quality of life. Visit sirfoundation.org.

About the Society of Interventional Radiology

The Society of Interventional Radiology is a nonprofit, professional medical society representing more than 5,000 practicing interventional radiology physicians, scientists and clinical associates, dedicated to improving patient care through the limitless potential of image-guided therapies. SIR's members work in a variety of settings and at different professional levels--from medical students and residents to university faculty and private practice physicians. Visit sirweb.org.

Society of Interventional Radiology

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