66th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting: 402 young scientists to participate

March 03, 2016

402 young scientists from 80 countries will participate in the 66th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting. They are outstanding students, graduate students and post-docs under 35 years of age, conducting research in the field of physics. The participants had successfully applied in a multi-stage international selection process, the results of which have now been announced. The meeting will take place from 26 June to 1 July and is designed as a forum for exchange, networking and inspiration. Technically it is dedicated to physics; a total of 30 laureates are expected to partake. The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings have been held annually at Lindau, Germany, since 1951.

"The Nobel Laureates will get to meet some especially qualified and committed young people this summer," says Wolfgang Lubitz, Director of the Max Plack Institute for Chemical Energy Conversion and Vice-President of the Council for the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings. "The proportion of women is 31 percent - a good, internationally representative number in the field of physics."

Due to the ongoing modernisation of the local conference venue, this year's meeting will take place in Lindau's city theatre. Accordingly, the usual number of 600 participants had to be reduced to 400. The selected young scientists may expect a six-day programme with numerous lectures and panel discussions. Many see the chance to present their own research work at one of the master classes or at the poster session as a special opportunity.

"The attendance steadily became more international as part of the continuous expansion of the network of academic partner institutions," explains Burkhard Fricke, professor emeritus for theoretical physics and coordinator of the selection process. "This year's participants represent 80 countries, including great research nations like the US, the United Kingdom, Japan, Israel, and Germany, just as developing countries like Bangladesh or Cameroon. 144 academies of science, universities, foundations, and researching enterprises were involved in the selection process."

When selecting participants from China, the Council cooperated with the Sino-German Center for Research Promotion (SGC). "In the People's Republic alone, 24 universities and one academy institute were involved," says Rainer Blatt, Managing and Research Director of the Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information at Innsbruck (IQOQI), member of the Council and responsible of this year's meeting's scientific programme in the capacity of scientific chairman. "Following a preselection, we had to review 79 applications. In the next step, 40 applicants were invited for personal interviews to Beijing last weekend. Finally, we found 19 young scientists very convincing - we are very much looking forward to welcoming them in in Lindau this summer."

Among the Nobel Laureates who have already confirmed their participation are Japan's Takaaki Kajita and Arthur B. McDonald from the US. They were jointly awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2015 for the discovery of neutrino oscillations, which shows that neutrinos have mass. Particle Physics will be among the key issues of the Lindau Meeting.
-end-


Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

Related Physics Articles from Brightsurf:

Helium, a little atom for big physics
Helium is the simplest multi-body atom. Its energy levels can be calculated with extremely high precision only relying on a few fundamental physical constants and the quantum electrodynamics (QED) theory.

Hyperbolic metamaterials exhibit 2T physics
According to Igor Smolyaninov of the University of Maryland, ''One of the more unusual applications of metamaterials was a theoretical proposal to construct a physical system that would exhibit two-time physics behavior on small scales.''

Challenges and opportunities for women in physics
Women in the United States hold fewer than 25% of bachelor's degrees, 20% of doctoral degrees and 19% of faculty positions in physics.

Indeterminist physics for an open world
Classical physics is characterized by the equations describing the world.

Leptons help in tracking new physics
Electrons with 'colleagues' -- other leptons - are one of many products of collisions observed in the LHCb experiment at the Large Hadron Collider.

Has physics ever been deterministic?
Researchers from the Austrian Academy of Sciences, the University of Vienna and the University of Geneva, have proposed a new interpretation of classical physics without real numbers.

Twisted physics
A new study in the journal Nature shows that superconductivity in bilayer graphene can be turned on or off with a small voltage change, increasing its usefulness for electronic devices.

Physics vs. asthma
A research team from the MIPT Center for Molecular Mechanisms of Aging and Age-Related Diseases has collaborated with colleagues from the U.S., Canada, France, and Germany to determine the spatial structure of the CysLT1 receptor.

2D topological physics from shaking a 1D wire
Published in Physical Review X, this new study propose a realistic scheme to observe a 'cold-atomic quantum Hall effect.'

Helping physics teachers who don't know physics
A shortage of high school physics teachers has led to teachers with little-to-no training taking over physics classrooms, reports show.

Read More: Physics News and Physics Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.