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Using streaming online media such as YouTube to learn new surgical techniques

March 03, 2016

A small survey American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (AAFPRS) members found that most of them had used online streaming media (i.e. YouTube) at least once to learn a new technique and most had used those techniques in practice, according to an article published online by JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery.

Anita Sethna, M.D., of the Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, and coauthors surveyed AAFPRS members and received 202 responses, about 8 percent of the AAFPRS membership.

The most popular ways to stay current with technical and nontechnical findings included meetings, journals and discussions with colleagues. However, 64.1 percent of respondents said they had used online media at least once to learn a new technique, especially for rhinoplasty and injectable procedures, and 83.1 percent had used those techniques in their practice. Less experienced surgeons were more likely to have used online streaming media than more experienced surgeons.

"The enthusiasm is not unbridled, however. The Internet's ease of access has raised concerns regarding the quality of these sources," the authors note.
-end-
To read the whole study, please visit the For The Media website.

(JAMA Facial Plast Surg. Published March 3, 2016. doi:10.1001/jamafacial.2016.0007. Available pre-embargo to the media at http://media.jamanetwork.com.)

Editor's Note: Please see the articles for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.

To contact study corresponding author Anita Sethna, M.D., email asethna@emory.edu.

To place an electronic embedded link to this study in your story The link for this study will be live at the embargo time: http://archfaci.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?doi=10.1001/jamafacial.2016.0007

The JAMA Network Journals

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