70 percent of drug-addicted men admit they consume drugs to increase their sexual pleasure

March 04, 2009

72.28 per cent of drug addict men admit to have consumed drugs to be able to have sexual relations and most of them (58%) choose cocaine to this purpose, the narcotic which increases the most sexual incapacitation. On the other hand, only 37.50% drug addict women consume drugs to this purpose, and when they do, they resort to cocaine (37%), speed ball (25%) and alcohol (25%).

Those are the conclusions of a study carried out by Professors of the department of Personality, Evaluation and Psychological Treatment, where they have analysed the connection between drug consumption and sexual performance. They took a poll of 120 characters (104 male and 16 female drug addicts), aged between 17 and 23 years old and with an average age of 32.25, who were administered a poll together with the Addictive Behaviour Questionnaire, a test which assesses consumption seriousness.

Cocaine and alcohol to lose inhibition

Another conclusion of the work carried out at the UGR is that 50.98% of men use drugs to have sexual relations, as against 43.75% of women. This category also shows the differences by sexes, as men who consume drugs to lose their inhibition use alcohol and cocaine almost in the same proportion (43 and 37%, respectively), whereas in the case of women it is alcohol, with 72%, the most common substance.

The research work has been carried out by Professors Pablo Vallejo Medina, Miguel Pérez García and Juan Carlos Sierra, who insist that, in the light of the results obtained, men present a paradoxical fact, "as cocaine, which is the most commonly used drug as an enhancer factor of sexuality, is also the most incapacitating drug at a sexual level".

According to researchers, this fact could be due to that drug addicts use cocaine in order to increase their sexual power and performance which, as has been proved by authors such as Cregel and Mark, only happens when consumed in low doses and in the short term. Such conditions would be difficult to keep, as consumers, due to the habit and the dependence would tend to increase both the doses and the consumption time, seriously harming the sexual function.
-end-
The research work carried out at the UGR has been developed with the collaboration of the resource of the Social Services Network of the Andalusian Council, "Cortijo Buenos Aires" of Granada, Proyecto Hombre Granada and the Unit of Emotional and Addictive Disorders of the International Hospital Medimar of Alicante.

Reference: Pablo Vallejo Medina.
Department of Personality, Evaluation and Psychological Treatment of the University of Granada.
Phone number: +34 958 243750
E-mail: pvallejo@ugr.es

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University of Granada

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