Pregnant mothers with strong family support less likely to have postpartum depression, study finds

March 04, 2013

Women who receive strong social support from their families during pregnancy appear to be protected from sharp increases in a particular stress hormone, making them less likely to experience depression after giving birth, a new study by UCLA life scientists indicates.

"Now we have some clue as to how support might 'get under the skin' in pregnancy, dampening down a mother's stress hormone and thereby helping to reduce her risk for postpartum depression," said Jennifer Hahn-Holbrook, a UCLA National Institute of Mental Health postdoctoral scholar in psychology, a fellow at UCLA's Institute of Society and Genetics and the lead author of the research.

The scientists recruited 210 pregnant women of different ethnicities and socioeconomic backgrounds, surveying them three times during pregnancy -- at 19, 29 and 37 weeks -- and then eight weeks after giving birth. The women were asked in interviews about how much support they received from their families and the child's father and about their symptoms of depression. In addition, blood samples from all participants were analyzed to assess their levels of placental corticotropin-releasing hormone (pCRH), a stress hormone released from the placenta.

After taking into account factors such as age, education and income, Hahn-Holbrook and her colleagues discovered that pregnant women who reported the greatest support from their families had lower levels of depressive symptoms. They also had the least dramatic increases in pCRH and the lowest absolute levels of pCRH in the third trimester of pregnancy.

Additional analyses revealed that pCRH levels in the third trimester fully explained the relationship between family support in pregnancy and postpartum depression symptoms.

These results are consistent with the idea that social support limits abnormal pCRH increases and that lower pCRH levels, in turn, reduce the risk of postpartum depression. The research is published March 4 in the online edition of the journal Clinical Psychological Science and will be published in an upcoming print edition.

"Our results, and those of other scientists, suggest that low or absent support is a significant risk factor for postpartum depression and that strong support is a protective factor," Hahn-Holbrook said.

Previous research has found that levels of pCRH typically increase during the third trimester of pregnancy. Women who exhibited the most dramatic increases in the hormone showed the most severe postpartum depression. Research has also demonstrated that social support can dampen biological stress responses in women who are not pregnant. In the new study, Hahn-Holbrook and colleagues integrated these two strands of research, examining the interplay between a psychological factor, social support and a biological factor, pCRH, in predicting postpartum depression.

"We investigated perceived support -- the extent to which a mother felt she could count on her family and the baby's father should she need them," said Chris Dunkel Schetter, a professor of psychology at UCLA and co-author of the study. Social support, she added, entails many things, including help with "tasks or material assistance," but also emotional support, including acceptance, listening and making someone feel cared for and valued.

"Emotional support seems to be the most powerful form of support that you can provide someone, but it is difficult to do right," Dunkel Schetter said.

While pregnant women who felt strong support from their families and from their child's father had fewer depressive symptoms, there was no relationship between support from the father and levels of pCRH. Although father support was not as strong of a protective factor against postpartum depression as family support in this study, "there is no doubt that fathers are a critical part of a healthy pregnancy," Hahn-Holbrook said. It could be that support from the father influences pCRH levels earlier in pregnancy, or father support may act by a different biological or behavioral pathway altogether, she said.

"Mothers with support from fathers may be more likely to practice healthy behaviors, which has been shown to contribute both to healthier babies and lower postpartum disturbance," Dunkel Schetter added.

The study's results suggest that the timing of support interventions is especially important. Because levels of pCRH in the last trimester contribute to postpartum depression, early social-support interventions might provide a buffer against both elevated pCRH and depressive symptoms, Dunkel Schetter said. Too many interventions in the past have been mounted too late in pregnancy, she added.

More research should be conducted, Dunkel Schetter said, to determine when and how to provide optimal support to mothers during pregnancy. Her laboratory is conducting further research in this area.

Sharp increases in pCRH over the course of pregnancy are also associated with preterm births, defined as births earlier than 37 weeks of gestation. It is possible that social support or other stress reduction methods provided early in pregnancy could provide health benefits in this respect, and ultimately for the baby as well, the researchers said.

"Even better would be to support and educate women before pregnancy to maximize healthy pregnancies," Dunkel Schetter said.
-end-
Co-authors of the research included Chander Arora and Calvin Hobel of Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. The research was federally funded by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, a part of the National Institutes of Health.

For more about Dunkel Schetter's research, visit http://ucla.in/ZEmvcd.

UCLA is California's largest university, with an enrollment of more than 40,000 undergraduate and graduate students. The UCLA College of Letters and Science and the university's 11 professional schools feature renowned faculty and offer 337 degree programs and majors. UCLA is a national and international leader in the breadth and quality of its academic, research, health care, cultural, continuing education and athletic programs. Six alumni and six faculty have been awarded the Nobel Prize.

For more news, visit the UCLA Newsroom and follow us on Twitter.

University of California - Los Angeles

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