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Bringing more human intelligence to AI, data science and digital automation

March 04, 2019

New Rochelle, NY, March 4, 2019-- The advent of data science, wireless connectivity and sensors, artificial intelligence (AI), and the Internet of Things (IoT) has raised the prospects for digital automation, smart hospital design and the home health care industry for an aging population.

A new horizon scanning analysis described why AI, data science, and digital automation need more of the human element. The article, "Not All Intelligence is Artificial: Data Science, Automation, and AI Meet HI", was published in the February issue of OMICS: A Journal of Integrative Biology, the peer-reviewed interdisciplinary journal by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The horizon scanning technology analysis suggests several strategies such as routine use of metadata so that AI, data science and automation can work together with human intelligence (HI), thus effectively and sustainably serving modern healthcare, patients and laboratory medicine. Click here to read the full-text article free on the OMICS website through March 25, 2019.

Vural Özdemir, MD, PhD, DABCP, OMICS Editor-in-Chief, has commented, "These are exciting times for innovation in healthcare and laboratory medicine. But we also need social innovation in new technology design and implementation. AI, data science and digital automation would best serve medicine, healthcare and industry if they were informed by the human element and human intelligence (HI) to a greater degree. HI is also important to prevent type 3 (framing) errors in AI and digital automation, that is, 'finding the right answers for the wrong questions'".

AI, machine learning and digital automation have also been featured in several other leading articles published in OMICS. Complete tables of content are available on the OMICS website.
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About the Journal

OMICS: A Journal of Integrative Biology is an authoritative and highly innovative peer-reviewed interdisciplinary journal published monthly online, addressing the latest advances at the intersection of postgenomics medicine, biotechnology and global society, including the integration of multi-omics knowledge, data analyses and modeling, and applications of high-throughput approaches to study complex biological and societal problems. Public policy, governance and societal aspects of the large-scale biology and 21st century data-enabled sciences are also peer-reviewed. Complete tables of content and a sample issue may be viewed on the OMICS: A Journal of Integrative Biology website.

About the Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many areas of science and biomedical research, including Journal of Computational Biology, ASSAY and Drug Development Technologies, and Zebrafish. Its biotechnology trade magazine, GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 80 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

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