7th World Congress for Rett Syndrome to convene in New Orleans, La., June 22-26

March 05, 2012

(Baton Rouge, March 5, 2012) The International Rett Syndrome Foundation (IRSF) has named local resident Kathryn Schanen Kissam as Chair of the 7th World Congress for Rett Syndrome. The World Congress will consist of four interconnected meetings targeting researchers, clinicians, medical professionals and families impacted by Rett syndrome. These meetings include a Family Education Conference and a Science Symposium co-chaired by renowned Howard Hughes Medical Institute researchers Huda Zoghbi, M.D., Baylor College of Medicine and Director of the Jan and Dan Duncan Neurological Institute and Gail Mandel, Ph.D. Vollum Institute, Oregon Health and Science University.

"The objective of the World Congress is to accelerate treatments and a cure of Rett syndrome and related disorders by stimulating and accelerating novel global research and establishing current standards of care and I'm truly honored to be named Chair." said Kissam. "Families affected by Rett syndrome across the globe need access to the tools and knowledge necessary to improve health and quality of life," she said. Kissam has served as Chairman of IRSF since 2003.

Louisiana's First Lady Supriya Jindal joined Kissam in welcoming the World Congress to Louisiana saying, "We are delighted that New Orleans has been selected as the first United States host city for the 7th World Congress on Rett syndrome. I'm honored to welcome many of the world's most prominent Rett syndrome professionals to our state to uncover ways to benefit families affected by Rett and many other related neurological conditions."

IRSF is holding the World Congress in the U.S. for the first time. Previous sites have included Paris, Ottawa, Vienna and Tokyo.
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About International Rett Syndrome Foundation

IRSF is the world's leading private funder of basic and clinical Rett syndrome research and is the most comprehensive non-profit organization dedicated to providing thorough and accurate information about Rett syndrome, offering informational and emotional family support, and stimulating research aimed at accelerating treatments and a cure for Rett syndrome and related disorders. To learn more about IRSF and Rett syndrome, visit www.rettsyndrome.org or call IRSF at 1-800-818-RETT.

International Rett Syndrome Foundation

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