INRS overcomes a hurdle in the development of terahertz lasers

March 06, 2013

Dr. Roberto Morandotti and his team at the INRS Énergie Matériaux Télécommunications Research Centre have developed a device that is critical to the use of terahertz (THz) sources for a variety of applications. Their electromagnetic non-reciprocal isolator is the subject of a recent article in Nature Communications, showing just how important this new development is. Until now, no isolator existed that was effective in the THz region of the spectrum, a situation that held back the development of certain technologies. The new device paves the way for applications using terahertz frequencies including the development of terahertz lasers and amplifiers, to which the scientific community is currently devoting much attention.

Recent advances in the field of THz wave sources and detectors have spurred the development of imaging, communications, and spectroscopy technologies--these last used in the detection of explosives. All these technologies use electromagnetic spectrum bandwidths for which current isolators are not suitable.

An isolator is needed to prevent reflected waves from distorting measurements or damaging other components. Thus the absence of a workable isolator represented a major limitation to the use of THz wave sources. Dr. Morandotti's work at INRS provides the first solution to this problem, using a strontium iron oxide (SrFe12O19) magnet, which has the additional benefit of requiring no external magnetic field.
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About this publication

The article, entitled "A magnetic non-reciprocal isolator for broadband terahertz operation," appeared March 5, 2013, in Nature Communications (4:1558, DOI: 10.1038/natcomms2572). The work of Roberto Morandotti, professor and researcher at INRS Énergie Matériaux Télécommunications Research Centre, is made possible thanks to funding from Fonds de recherche du Québec - Nature et technologies (FQRNT) and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

About INRS

Institut national de recherche scientifique (INRS) is a graduate-level research and training university and ranks first in Canada for research intensity (average grant funding per faculty member). INRS brings together some 150 professors and close to 700 students and postdoctoral fellows at its four centres in Montreal, Quebec City, Laval, and Varennes. Its applied and fundamental research is essential to the advancement of science in Quebec and internationally even as it plays a key role in the development of concrete solutions to the problems faced by our society.

Institut national de la recherche scientifique - INRS

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