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Innovations to prevent heart disease take center stage at EuroPrevent congress

March 06, 2017

Sophia Antipolis 6 March 2017. Innovations to prevent heart disease will take centre stage at EuroPrevent 2017 in Malaga, Spain.

EuroPrevent is the annual congress of the European Association of Preventive Cardiology (EAPC), a registered branch of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). EuroPrevent 2017 takes place 6 to 8 April at the Palacio de Ferias y Congresos de Malaga (FYCMA). The full scientific programme is available here

This year's theme is "innovations in preventive cardiology". The congress will explore novel ideas and technologies that could have an impact on society and what that impact could mean. "It's the right time to talk about innovation in preventive cardiology because we are moving beyond classical treatments and approaches on a number of fronts," said Professor Jean-Paul Schmid, programme committee chair.

Could the Nordic diet be the new Mediterranean diet? Experts will discuss how it provides cardiovascular protection that is also eco-friendly. Sessions on nutrition will also explore diet and the microbiome as the next frontier in cardiovascular prevention, examine whether patients with metabolic syndrome should eat low carbohydrate or low cholesterol diets, and ask "Do superfoods exist and do we need them?".

"Nutrition used to be our main weapon to lower cholesterol but it took a back seat when statins came on the scene," said Professor Schmid. "EuroPrevent will look at new therapeutic uses of food and nutrients and also the potential dangers of genetically modified food."

A breakthrough in the management of high cholesterol could see some patients using monoclonal antibodies called PCSK9-inhibitors. Journalists will find out which patients should add these to their statin regime and how effective the newer drugs are. Novel oral antidiabetic drugs are another important discovery that will be presented.

Professor Schmid said: "Monoclonal antibodies are used in oncology and rheumatology, and now intensive lipid lowering with this new class of drugs is a hot topic. This potent medication may help patients unable to reach cholesterol targets on statins alone and better protect patients with familial hypercholesterolaemia who have genetically high cholesterol. Leaders in the field will talk about the safety of very low lipid levels."

A session on social inequalities will examine cardiovascular disease incidence and survival in migrants, and explain the association between cardiovascular risk factors and borough socioeconomic level. "Cardiovascular disease in migrants is an increasingly important topic and we need strategies for prevention," said Professor Schmid. "Members of the press will hear about the scale of the problem, how these populations are unique, and how we might screen and then help them."

The latest science on the health effects of e-cigarettes and waterpipe will be presented, along with the impact of TV and movies on tobacco use and cessation in the young. "After the harms of secondhand smoke were confirmed and actions taken to prevent it we thought we knew everything about tobacco," said Professor Schmid. "But e-cigarettes have reactivated the discussion about smoking, smoking cessation, and smoking behaviour. We will delve into the latest facts about the hazards of e-cigarettes and waterpipe."

Experts will present the most up-to-date evidence on physical activity monitoring in patients with cardiovascular disease and investigate whether mobile apps help prevent cardiovascular disease in people of all ages. Journalists will hear lively, balanced debates on whether too much exercise can be detrimental to cardiovascular health, and whether exercise restriction is necessary for athletes with cardiac disease.

Dr Michael Joner, previous winner of an ESC Grant for Medical Research Innovation will give the EuroPrevent 2017 Keynote Lecture. The Spanish Society of Cardiology will hold cardiopulmonary resuscitation workshops for the general public at Malaga Town Hall on all three days of the congress.

Professor Schmid said: "As the leading international congress in preventive cardiology, EuroPrevent covers epidemiology and population science, cardiac rehabilitation and exercise, and sports cardiology. We are expecting more than 1000 cardiologists, allied health professionals, general practitioners, researchers and policy makers to attend. Journalists should register now for this top notch event."
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European Society of Cardiology

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