Continuous pain is often not assessed during neonatal intensive care

March 06, 2017

In an analysis of 243 neonatal intensive care units from 18 European countries, investigators found that only 2113 of 6648 (31.8%) newborns were assessed for prolonged, continuous pain. Daily assessments of continuous pain occurred in only 10.4% of newborns.

Intensive care units with local pain management guidelines, nursing champions, and increased surgical admissions performed assessments of continuous pain more frequently than other units.

"A lot of these babies are exposed to prolonged pain caused by surgical operations, repeated invasive procedures, or inflammatory diseases," said Dr. Kanwaljeet J. S. Anand, lead author of the Acta Paediatrica study. "In the absence of frequent assessments, I'm concerned that many babies may be under-treated or over-treated for painful conditions. We need to develop better ways for monitoring pain in newborn babies."
-end-


Wiley

Related Intensive Care Units Articles from Brightsurf:

Hospital COVID-19 risk lowest among intensive care staff
Contrary to expectations, the risk of COVID-19 infection among hospital staff at the height of the coronavirus pandemic was lowest among intensive care clinicians, reveals a study of one major UK medical centre, published in the journal Thorax.

Pregnant women with COVID-19 may more likely need intensive care and give birth early
Pregnant women seen in hospitals with covid-19 are less likely to show symptoms, and seem to be at increased risk of needing admission to an intensive care unit than non-pregnant women of similar age, finds a study published by The BMJ today.

Many children in intensive care may not be getting rehabilitation therapy, study shows
Adult patients in hospital intensive care units (ICUs) are often given rehabilitation therapy and urged to keep mobile from an early point in their hospital stays.

Cognitive impairment after intensive care linked to long-lasting inflammation
People who have been treated in intensive care commonly suffer from residual cognitive impairment, but the reason for this is unknown.

New guidelines for hepatic failure in the intensive care unit
For critical care specialists, hepatic failure poses complex challenges unlike those of other critical illnesses.

ICUs receive higher satisfaction scores for end-of-life care than other hospital units
The research challenges a common belief that dying in the ICU is a less favorable experience than dying elsewhere in the hospital.

Once scarce, neonatal intensive care proliferates
Is NICU care being driven by medical need or competition?

Shorter rotations in intensive care units mitigate burnout among physicians
Shortening the length of rotations in a medical intensive care unit (MICU) from the traditional 14-consecutive day schedule to only seven days helps mitigate burnout among critical care physicians, according to a new Penn Medicine pilot study.

Quieter intensive care units may translate to better outcomes for infants in new study
Excessive noise is widely known to have negative effects on health, and children in neonatal intensive care units are among the most vulnerable.

Lessons from Everest's Sherpas could aid intensive care treatment
A research expedition to Mount Everest has shed light on the unique physiological basis of adaptations seen in the native Sherpa people, which make them better suited to life at high altitude.

Read More: Intensive Care Units News and Intensive Care Units Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.