Study shows cycling as number one cause of cervical fractures in men

March 06, 2018

NEW ORLEANS, La. (March 6, 2018)-Sporting-related cervical fractures increased by 35 percent from 2000 to 2015, mainly due to an increase in cycling-related injuries, according to research presented at the 2018 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS). Men experienced the most fractures due to cycling, while the most common cause of fractures in women was horseback riding. The most common cause of cervical spine injury in the United States was football, with the majority of those injuries being sprains.

"Cervical spine injury is a substantial cause of morbidity and mortality, and, as far as injuries go, one of the more devastating injuries that we as orthopaedic surgeons can treat," said lead study author J. Mason DePasse, MD, orthopaedic trauma surgery fellow at Brown University. "There isn't much data available on spine/neck injuries in recreational activities and sports. The most recent paper we quoted was from 1991 and looked only at 63 male patients. In our study, we were able to sort through more than 50,000 cases by utilizing data analytics, which would have been nearly impossible to sift through by hand. The biggest takeaway was that cycling is the number one cause of neck fractures, which suggests we may need to investigate this in terms of safety."

Sporting activities are the fourth most common cause of cervical spine injury; however previous studies relied mainly on media reports, which resulted in significant underreporting. This study utilized the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) database, which is managed by the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) and collects information on emergency room patients from 100 U.S. hospitals. The researchers used the NEISS database to estimate the sex-specific incidence of cervical spine injuries in sporting activities and to identify the activities most commonly associated with neck sprains and cervical fractures.

The study authors identified 27,546 patients who sustained a neck injury during a sporting activity. Of these patients, the study found: The study demonstrated that while football remains the main cause of cervical injuries in the U.S., it was primarily associated with sprains and the overall incidence of football-related injuries decreased. The researchers hypothesized that this could be due to better protective equipment and safety rules. It also could be due to the increased use of computed tomography, which has resulted in an increased diagnosis of cervical spine fractures that may have been previously diagnosed as a sprain.

The team used SAS 9.4 for analysis and built algorithms involving string recognition and automated text analysis that went through the over 50,000 patient cases. Patients were preliminarily included based on specific criteria, including association with recreational activity, diagnosis code indicating fracture or strain/sprain, and body part indicating neck region. Repeated testing and algorithm refinement was utilized to exclude irrelevant cases. Statistical significance was defined as p<0.05.

"Our diverse team helped us to streamline our research, work faster and ask better questions," said DePasse. "When we - the orthopaedic surgeons - first looked at the problem, we thought it was impossible due to the sheer volume of cases. However, one of our team members - who is a medical student and previously worked as an analyst - said it could be done. When you have people with cross training and diverse backgrounds, you can often discover a different way of approaching problems."

The study, "Incidence of Cervical Spine Injuries Sustained During Sporting Activities," was previously presented at the December 2017 Cervical Spine Research Society Annual Meeting.
-end-
2018 AAOS Annual Meeting Disclosure Statement

The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

With more than 38,000 members, the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) is the world's largest medical association of musculoskeletal specialists. The AAOS provides education programs for orthopaedic surgeons and allied health professionals, champions and advances the highest quality musculoskeletal care for patients, and is the authoritative source of information on bone and joint conditions, treatments and related issues.

Visit AAOS at:

Newsroom.aaos.org for bone and joint health news, stats, facts, images and interview requests.
ANationinMotion.org for inspirational patient stories, and orthopaedic surgeon tips on maintaining bone and joint health, avoiding injuries, treating musculoskeletal conditions and navigating recovery.
Orthoinfo.org for patient information on hundreds of orthopaedic diseases and conditions.
Facebook.com/AAOS1
Twitter.com/AAOS1
Instagram.com/AAOS_1

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

Related Football Articles from Brightsurf:

Reasons for football injuries
If professional footballers are out of action due to injuries, this can have serious consequences for the club.

The best players are passionate about football
Sogndal football/soccer teams from Vestland county in Norway have now been studied by specialists.

Study provides the first data on concussion risk in youth football
'These are the first biomechanical data characterizing concussion risk in kids,' said Steve Rowson, an associate professor of biomedical engineering and mechanics and the director of the Virginia Tech Helmet Lab.

Changes in cardiovascular risk factors among college football players
Researchers recruited 126 college football players from two programs in Georgia and South Carolina to examine over three years how cardiovascular risk factors emerged and changed, including weight, blood pressure and heart structure and function.

Over-conditioning kills: Non-traumatic fatalities in football is preventable
Most non-traumatic fatalities among high school and college football athletes do not occur while playing the game of football, but rather during conditioning sessions which are often associated with overexertion or punishment drills required by coaches and team staff, according to research presented today at the American Orthopedic Society for Sports Medicine Annual Meeting.

American football: The first quarter is crucial
Researchers from Dartmouth College, New Hampshire have found evidence that players born in the first quarter of the year are more likely to play in the National Football League.

How do professional football players perform under immense pressure?
Professional football players need to keep a cool head during a match, but some are better at this than others.

New findings on concussion in football's youngest players
New research from Seattle Children's Research Institute and UW Medicine's Sports Health and Safety Institute found concussion rates among football players ages 5-14 were higher than previously reported, with five out of every 100 youth, or 5 percent, sustaining a football-related concussion each season.

Youth football changes nerve fibers in brain
MRI scans show that repetitive blows to the head result in brain changes among youth football players, according to a new study.

Playing youth football could affect brain development
Young football players may experience a disruption in brain development after a single season of the sport, according to a new study.

Read More: Football News and Football Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.