Nav: Home

Study reveals disparities in osteoporosis treatment by sex and race/ethnicity

March 06, 2019

New research indicates that elderly men are significantly undertreated for osteoporosis compared with elderly women, and blacks have the lowest treatment rates among racial/ethnic groups. The findings are published in the Journal of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research.

In the study of 8,465 male and 90,956 female Medicare beneficiaries with osteoporosis, the prevalence of osteoporosis medication use was substantially less in men than in women (25.2 percent versus 44.3 percent in 2006).

Blacks had by far the lowest treatment rates (30 percent for women and 15.5 percent for men). Whites were in the middle (44.4 percent for women and 24.5 percent for men), and Asians had the highest rates (64.4 percent for women and 37.9 percent for men). Treatment rates among Hispanic women (46.5 percent) exceeded that of whites, but the rate for Hispanic men (19.3 percent) was significantly below that for white men.

Bone mineral density testing significantly increased the probability of osteoporosis treatment use for both sexes, but more so for men.

"We found that there was a significant gender disparity in osteoporosis treatment in the elderly in the United States," said co-author Dr. Feng-Hua Ellen Loh, of Touro College, in New York. "To reduce this disparity and improve the overall osteoporosis management in the elderly in this country, the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services should include men, in addition to women, in the Medicare Part C Star Rating measure for osteoporosis management, and the US Preventive Services Task Force should include elderly men, in addition to women aged 65 years and older, in the recommendation for screening for osteoporosis by using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry."
-end-


Wiley

Related Osteoporosis Articles:

New pharmaceutical target reverses osteoporosis in mice
Biomedical engineers at Duke University have discovered that an adenosine receptor called A2B can be pharmaceutically activated to reverse bone degradation caused by osteoporosis in mouse models of the disease.
A link between mitochondrial damage and osteoporosis
In healthy people, a tightly controlled process balances out the activity of osteoblasts, which build bone, and osteoclasts, which break it down.
Many stroke patients not screened for osteoporosis, despite known risks
Many stroke survivors have an increased risk of osteoporosis, falls or breaks when compared to healthy people.
Many postmenopausal women do not receive treatment for osteoporosis
The benefits of treating osteoporosis in postmenopausal women outweigh the perceived risks, according to a Clinical Practice Guideline issued today by the Endocrine Society.
A new 'atlas' of genetic influences on osteoporosis
A ground-breaking new study led by researchers from the Lady Davis Institute (LDI) at the Jewish General Hospital (JGH) has succeeded in compiling an atlas of genetic factors associated with estimated bone mineral density (BMD), one of the most clinically relevant factors in diagnosing osteoporosis.
New recommendations for the conduct of economic evaluations in osteoporosis
An expert working group has established recommendations for the design and conduct of economic evaluations in osteoporosis, as well as guidance for reporting these evaluations.
From receptor structure to new osteoporosis drugs
Researchers at the University of Zurich have determined the three-dimensional structure of a receptor that controls the release of calcium from bones.
How a Mediterranean diet could reduce osteoporosis
Eating a Mediterranean-type diet could reduce bone loss in people with osteoporosis -- according to new research from the University of East Anglia.
Osteoporosis drug may benefit heart health
The osteoporosis drug alendronate was linked with a reduced risk of cardiovascular death, heart attack, and stroke in a Journal of Bone and Mineral Research study of patients with hip fractures.
New treatment for osteoporosis provides better protection against fractures
A new treatment for osteoporosis provides major improvements in bone density and more effective protection against fractures than the current standard treatment.
More Osteoporosis News and Osteoporosis Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Rethinking Anger
Anger is universal and complex: it can be quiet, festering, justified, vengeful, and destructive. This hour, TED speakers explore the many sides of anger, why we need it, and who's allowed to feel it. Guests include psychologists Ryan Martin and Russell Kolts, writer Soraya Chemaly, former talk radio host Lisa Fritsch, and business professor Dan Moshavi.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#538 Nobels and Astrophysics
This week we start with this year's physics Nobel Prize awarded to Jim Peebles, Michel Mayor, and Didier Queloz and finish with a discussion of the Nobel Prizes as a way to award and highlight important science. Are they still relevant? When science breakthroughs are built on the backs of hundreds -- and sometimes thousands -- of people's hard work, how do you pick just three to highlight? Join host Rachelle Saunders and astrophysicist, author, and science communicator Ethan Siegel for their chat about astrophysics and Nobel Prizes.