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Component of marijuana may help treat anxiety and substance abuse disorders

March 07, 2017

Cannabidiol, a major component of cannabis or marijuana, appears to have effects on emotion and emotional memory, which could be helpful for treating anxiety-related and substance abuse disorders.

A recent review highlights the results of studies that have investigated cannabidiol's effects on various fear and drug memory processes.

"Cannabis is best known for the 'high' caused by the chemical Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) but it contains many other chemicals with potential medicinal properties, including cannabidiol," said Dr. Carl Stevenson, senior author of the British Journal of Pharmacology review. "This chemical isn't linked to the cannabis 'high' and is safe for people to use, so it might be helpful for alleviating certain symptoms of these disorders without having unwanted side effects of cannabis."
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Wiley

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