Nav: Home

Peeling back the data: NYS apple industry has larger economic impact

March 07, 2019

ITHACA, N.Y. - A Cornell University team has found that the economic impact of the apple industry in New York State is 21 percent larger than traditional models suggest. Researchers used the apple industry as a case study to test a new - more precise - framework for economic impact analysis.

Traditional economic impact analyses often rely on secondary state and national data, which can give a distorted picture of how an agricultural industry will affect a local economy. The new model uses locally sourced data showing what farmers are spending their income on and where.

"If the analysis has implications for private or public local economic development initiatives, the more accurate the numbers, the better," said Todd Schmit, lead author of the study. "Collecting local data is really hard, it's costly, it's time consuming. The flip side is, in most cases, that's time and money well spent."

In a related report, the team found every $1 of apples or apple products sold in New York state generates an additional 58 cents spent in related industries, such as support services and supplies. Every apple industry job generates an additional 0.48 jobs, and every $1 of direct apple-industry gross domestic product generates an additional $1.14 in GDP from related business activity in the state. In total, the apple industry supports more than $2 billion in industry output and nearly 12,000 jobs.

The model can assess the economic impact of any agricultural sector, said Schmit, associate professor in the Charles H. Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management.

Depending on the agricultural sector being assessed, the model may not show an increase in economic impact, as it did in the case study. But, Schmit said, it will offer a more accurate analysis. "When you're trying to extract a particular industry from an aggregate of multiple industries," he said, "I would expect you're going to get bigger differences."
-end-
Schmit's co-authors are Roberta Severson, program leader of the Cornell Cooperative Enterprise Program at Dyson; Jesse Strzok formerly of Cornell Cooperative Extension; and former undergraduate research intern Jose Barros of the University of Sao Paulo, Brazil.

The research which appeared in the Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Community Development, was supported in part by the New York Apple Association.

Cornell University has dedicated television and audio studios available for media interviews supporting full HD, ISDN and web-based platforms.

Cornell University

Related Additional Articles:

Researchers at LSTM identify additional mechanisms at play in insecticide resistance
Researchers at LSTM have used a bioinformatics approach to integrate information from multiple studies on insecticide resistance in mosquitoes and uncovered a number of important resistance mechanisms that had not previously been recognised.
Researchers identify additional inoculation source for lambic beer production
Researchers in Belgium have identified an additional inoculation source - the wooden casks or foeders - for producing lambic beers.
Nearly 14 million additional adolescents need HPV vaccination to reach public health goal
Nearly 14 million additional adolescents will need to receive the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine to reach the American Cancer Society's goal of an 80 percent vaccination rate by that 2026.
Additional inhibitor can help anti-VEGF therapy overcome resistance in deadly brain cancer
Adding another inhibitor to therapies that cut off a tumor's access to blood vessels could be the key to helping those therapies overcome resistance in glioblastoma, a deadly form of brain cancer.
Additional therapy after surgical removal of rare tumors may not increase survival
Results of an analysis from the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine show that additional therapy, or adjuvant therapy, delivered after surgical removal of a rare type of gastrointestinal tumor does not increase survival rates for patients.
NASA's James Webb Observatory prepares for additional testing
Engineers removed the combined optics and science instruments of NASA's James Webb Space Telescope from their shipping container in a high bay at Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems in Redondo Beach, California, on March 8, signaling the next step in the observatory's integration and testing.
New analytical method provides an insight into additional chromosomes
A new technique promises to identify additional chromosomes involved in carcinogenesis.
Abbreviated breast MRI may be additional screening option for dense breasts
Among women with dense breast tissue, for whom traditional mammograms are less effective at detecting cancer, who request additional screening after a negative mammogram, abbreviated breast MRI (AB-MR) may be a valuable cancer detection tool.
If your child is bilingual, learning additional languages later might be easier
It is often claimed that people who are bilingual are better than monolinguals at learning languages.

Related Additional Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Setbacks
Failure can feel lonely and final. But can we learn from failure, even reframe it, to feel more like a temporary setback? This hour, TED speakers on changing a crushing defeat into a stepping stone. Guests include entrepreneur Leticia Gasca, psychology professor Alison Ledgerwood, astronomer Phil Plait, former professional athlete Charly Haversat, and UPS training manager Jon Bowers.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#524 The Human Network
What does a network of humans look like and how does it work? How does information spread? How do decisions and opinions spread? What gets distorted as it moves through the network and why? This week we dig into the ins and outs of human networks with Matthew Jackson, Professor of Economics at Stanford University and author of the book "The Human Network: How Your Social Position Determines Your Power, Beliefs, and Behaviours".