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ENDO 2019 news conferences to feature breakthroughs in diabetes, reproductive health, aging

March 07, 2019

WASHINGTON--Researchers will explore the link between unhealthy snack intake and screen time, long-term opioid use and its impact on men's testosterone levels, and other emerging science during news conferences at ENDO 2019, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting taking place March 23-26 in New Orleans, La.

The Society is debuting two new Clinical Practice Guidelines at the news conferences, which will be webcast at endowebcasting.com.

News Conference Schedule:

Saturday, March 23

Diabetes (8:30 a.m. CDT): The Society is unveiling its new Clinical Practice Guideline on treating older adults with diabetes. Researchers will also discuss how many older adults with type 1 diabetes are unaware of when they have low blood sugar, the technical challenges with implementing a new hybrid closed loop insulin pump (the precursor to the artificial pancreas), and how the hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) test misses many cases of diabetes.

Reproductive Health (11 a.m. CDT): Studies will highlight the correlation between improved PCOS symptoms and healthy gut bacteria, long-term opioid use and hormone deficiencies, how gender-affirming hormone therapy can strengthen brain connections in transgender women, and how repeat miscarriages may be caused by sperm DNA damage.

Sunday, March 24

Obesity (10 a.m. CDT): This press conference will examine the hormone oxytocin and its ability to weaken the brain's reward signals for food, a hormone released from fat tissue and how it may play a role in obesity-related asthma, exposure to HIV before birth and its link to obesity later in life, and why teens who sit for hours in front of the TV while eating unhealthy snacks are at increased risk for heart disease and diabetes.

EDCs (11:30 a.m. CDT): The EDC experts in this news conference will present research on chemicals in household dust and fat cell development, and how exposure to the widely used chemical bisphenol A (BPA) during pregnancy can alter circadian rhythms.

Monday, March 25

Aging (8 a.m. CDT): The Society is debuting a new Clinical Practice Guideline for treating osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. Researchers will also cover older men with higher levels of sex hormones and why they have a lower biological age, how changing when you eat may prevent postmenopausal breast cancer, and why walking downhill after meals may have a positive effect on bone health in postmenopausal women.

Reporters may register for the meeting at: https://www.xpressreg.net/media/start.php?sc=ENDO0319.

Reporters also may register to view live news conference webcasts at: endowebcasting.com.

More information about media resources at ENDO 2019 is available at http://www.endocrine.org/news-room/endo-annual-meeting.

Registered news media receive a badge that provides access to all meeting sessions, as well as to the newsroom and news conferences. No one will be admitted without a valid ENDO badge.
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Endocrinologists are at the core of solving the most pressing health problems of our time, from diabetes and obesity to infertility, bone health, and hormone-related cancers. The Endocrine Society is the world's oldest and largest organization of scientists devoted to hormone research and physicians who care for people with hormone-related conditions.

The Society has more than 18,000 members, including scientists, physicians, educators, nurses and students in 122 countries. To learn more about the Society and the field of endocrinology, visit our site at http://www.endocrine.org. Follow us on Twitter at @TheEndoSociety and @EndoMedia.

The Endocrine Society

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