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Is it ever too late for adults to benefit from physical activity?

March 08, 2019

Bottom Line: It may never be too late for adults to become physically active and enjoy some health benefits. This observational study looked at how patterns of leisure-time physical activity from adolescence (15 to 18) to later adulthood (40-61) were associated with risk of dying using data for 315,000 U.S. adults. The results suggest maintaining physical activity from adolescence into later adulthood was associated with lower risk of dying and so was increasing leisure-time physical activity in adulthood, including from age 41 to 60, for adults who had been less active. The study relied on self-reported hours per week of leisure-time physical activity, including historical questions about activity as a young person.

Authors: Pedro F. Saint-Maurice, Ph.D., National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, and coauthors

(doi: 10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2019.0355)

Editor's Note: The article contains funding/support disclosures. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.

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About JAMA Network Open: JAMA Network Open is the new online-only open access general medical journal from the JAMA Network. Every Friday, the journal publishes peer-reviewed clinical research and commentary in more than 40 medical and health subject areas. Every article is free online from the day of publication.
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JAMA Network Open

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