Understanding Ground Zero

March 09, 2004

Arlington, VA--Rapid-response researchers, driven by years of experience studying earthquake and flood disasters, rushed to collect critical data from Ground Zero within days of the September 11th attacks. Unseen by the public and below the radar screens of many in the media, the U.S. academic community was scrambling.

On Monday, Feb. 23, the National Science Foundation hosted six of the nation's top rapid-response researchers to report on their experiences at Ground Zero, highlighted the concerns facing disaster researchers and shared their results as collected in the recent compilation, Beyond September 11th: An Account of Post-Disaster Research.

NSF has now posted video and transcripts of each speaker's remarks, slides, and contact information at a new online showcase devoted to the event, Beyond September 11th: Rapid Response Disaster Research. All material is available for download at: http://www.nsf.gov/od/lpa/news/04/ma0404_agenda.htm.
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For more information or b-roll of the researchers' remarks, contact: Josh Chamot, 703-292-7730, jchamot@nsf.gov.

NSF PA/M 04-08

NSF is an independent federal agency that supports fundamental research and education across all fields of science and engineering, with an annual budget of nearly $5.58 billion. NSF funds reach all 50 states through grants to nearly 2,000 universities and institutions. Each year, NSF receives about 40,000 competitive requests for funding, and makes about 11,000 new funding awards. NSF also awards over $200 million in professional and service contracts yearly.

Receive official National Science Foundation news electronically through the e-mail delivery system, NSFnews. To subscribe, send an e-mail message to join-nsfnews@lists.nsf.gov. In the body of the message, type "subscribe nsfnews" and then type your name. (Ex.: "subscribe nsfnews John Smith")

National Science Foundation

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