2005 Craniofacial Biology Research Award

March 09, 2005

Baltimore, Maryland...The 2005 Craniofacial Biology Research Award is being presented today to Dr. William Hylander, of the Department of Biological Anthropology and Anatomy, Duke University (Durham, NC, USA). The award is part of the Opening Ceremonies of the 83rd General Session of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), convening at the Baltimore Convention Center.

Dr Hylander has made seminal contributions to modern experimental studies of bone adaptation, craniofacial evolution, and masticatory function. He pioneered the use of foil strain gauges bonded to the skull to investigate the mechanics of the mandible and the temporomandibular joint. He was the first to demonstrate in vivo loading of the jaw joint. He clarified the function of the mandibular symphysis and brow ridges and determined correlations between muscle activity and bone deformation. The techniques and approaches he developed have been widely applied in craniofacial biology, and his eminence has already been recognized by a variety of awards, including the highly prized Merit Award from the NIH.
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The Craniofacial Biology Research Award, supported by BioMimetic Pharmaceuticals and Osteohealth Company, was established to recognize individuals who have contributed to the body of knowledge in craniofacial biology over a significant period of time, and whose research contributions have been accepted by the scientific community. It consists of a cash prize and plaque, and represents one of the highest honors the IADR can bestow.

IADR Registration Area

International & American Associations for Dental Research

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