2005 Oral Medicine and Pathology Research Award

March 09, 2005

Baltimore, Maryland...Professor Newell W. Johnson, Dean of Griffith University's newly created School of Dentistry and Oral Health, Queensland, Australia, has been named the 2005 recipient of the Oral Medicine and Pathology Research Award, conferred by the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), convening here today for its 83rd General Session.

Professor Johnson has had a distinguished career in an unusually wide area of dental research. He has made significant contributions to the study of dental caries, periodontal diseases, and oral cancer. He has had a particular interest in the recognition of oral cancer by dentists, and has campaigned vigorously for prevention of the disease. In addition to his research, Professor Johnson examined and treated patients in his clinic at the King's Dental Institute (London, UK), taught dental students and post-graduate students, and is the Editor of the journal Oral Diseases. As the new head of the first new dental school in Australia in nearly 60 years, he will be instrumental in developing programs that are extremely innovative, not only in dentistry, but also in oral health therapy and dental technology. He is recognized internationally as an authority on dental and oral diseases, and the IADR is honored by his acceptance of this award.
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The IADR Oral Medicine and Pathology Research Award is supported Sunstar Butler and consists of a cash prize and a plaque. It is one of 15 Distinguished Scientist Awards given annually by the IADR.

Professor Johnson received his award today during the Opening Ceremonies of the IADR's 83rd General Session.

International & American Associations for Dental Research

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