ESA receives award for Technology Transfer

March 09, 2006

ESA has received an award for achievement in the public sector, for its Technology Transfer activities, announced at the first annual International Marketplace and Conference for Technology Transfer Professionals (IPTEC) in Cannes last month.

ESA can claim 200 successful examples of technology transfer in the past 16 years, leading to the set up of 30 companies being set up in Europe. The award, presented by the Mayor of Cannes, was received by Pierre Brisson, ESA Head of technology transfer and promotion. The IPTEC conference is a unique gathering of some of the world's leading experts in technology transfer, who will explain and discuss the latest corporate strategies, provide case studies of successful licensing programmes and take part in interactive sessions on technology transfer issues in different industries.

It is organised in association with the leading international industry magazine, Managing Intellectual Property. Keynote speakers included Marshall Phelps of Microsoft, Todd Dickinson of GE, Ruud Peters of Philips and Robert Suter of IBM.
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Around 200 technology transfer specialists from companies all over the world attended the event, which was held at the Palais des Festivals, Cannes. As well as the conference sessions, there were opportunities for networking and discussing licensing opportunities. Companies represented included 3M, Alcatel, ARM, BTG, Ericsson, Honeywell, Kimberly-Clark, NEC, Nokia, Xerox and many of the world's leading research universities

IBM won the inaugural industry award for achievement in technology transfer.

Stanford University was recognized for its achievement in technology transfer, thanks in particular to the success of Google and DNA cloning technology, which it developed with the University of California.

European Space Agency

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