Nav: Home

ESA receives award for Technology Transfer

March 09, 2006

ESA has received an award for achievement in the public sector, for its Technology Transfer activities, announced at the first annual International Marketplace and Conference for Technology Transfer Professionals (IPTEC) in Cannes last month.

ESA can claim 200 successful examples of technology transfer in the past 16 years, leading to the set up of 30 companies being set up in Europe. The award, presented by the Mayor of Cannes, was received by Pierre Brisson, ESA Head of technology transfer and promotion. The IPTEC conference is a unique gathering of some of the world's leading experts in technology transfer, who will explain and discuss the latest corporate strategies, provide case studies of successful licensing programmes and take part in interactive sessions on technology transfer issues in different industries.

It is organised in association with the leading international industry magazine, Managing Intellectual Property. Keynote speakers included Marshall Phelps of Microsoft, Todd Dickinson of GE, Ruud Peters of Philips and Robert Suter of IBM.
-end-
Around 200 technology transfer specialists from companies all over the world attended the event, which was held at the Palais des Festivals, Cannes. As well as the conference sessions, there were opportunities for networking and discussing licensing opportunities. Companies represented included 3M, Alcatel, ARM, BTG, Ericsson, Honeywell, Kimberly-Clark, NEC, Nokia, Xerox and many of the world's leading research universities

IBM won the inaugural industry award for achievement in technology transfer.

Stanford University was recognized for its achievement in technology transfer, thanks in particular to the success of Google and DNA cloning technology, which it developed with the University of California.

European Space Agency

Related Achievement Articles:

Achievement gaps may explain racial overrepresentation in special education
US school districts may be flagged as over-identifying students of color as having disabilities when other factors, such as achievement gaps, may explain these disparities, according to new Penn State research.
Weighing more than your twin at birth may predict better achievement at school
Research has shown that children who are born at a low birthweight are less likely to do well in school and more likely to live in lower-income neighborhoods as adults.
Teacher incentive programs can improve student achievement
Teacher incentive pay programs with a hybrid structure involving both individual and group incentives can have good results.
Kindergarten difficulties may predict academic achievement across primary grades
Identifying factors that predict academic difficulties during elementary school should help inform efforts to help children who may be at risk.
University choice and achievement partly down to DNA
Research from King's College London has shown for the first time that genetics plays a significant role in whether young adults choose to go to university, which university they choose to attend and how well they do.
Multilingual students have improved in academic achievement since 2003
Multilingual students, who speak a language or more than one language other than English at home, have improved in reading and math achievement substantially since 2003, finds a new study published in Educational Researcher by Michael J.
Rules about technology use can undermine academic achievement
Parents who restrict their children's use of new media technologies may be acting counterproductively in the long run, particularly if they invoke afterschool homework time as the reason.
Study explores link between curiosity and school achievement
The more curious the child, the more likely he or she may be to perform better in school -- regardless of economic background -- suggests a new University of Michigan study.
U of M study affirms new strategies for reducing achievement gap
Successful implementation of preschool to third grade programs yields benefits in increasing school readiness, improving attendance, and strengthening parental involvement in school education -- strategies that can close the achievement gap for children at risk, according to a new University of Minnesota study.
One factor that may help schools close racial achievement gap
A study of one Texas school district reveals one of the best evidence-based ways ever found to close the educational achievement gap between black and white students.
More Achievement News and Achievement Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Our Relationship With Water
We need water to live. But with rising seas and so many lacking clean water – water is in crisis and so are we. This hour, TED speakers explore ideas around restoring our relationship with water. Guests on the show include legal scholar Kelsey Leonard, artist LaToya Ruby Frazier, and community organizer Colette Pichon Battle.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#568 Poker Face Psychology
Anyone who's seen pop culture depictions of poker might think statistics and math is the only way to get ahead. But no, there's psychology too. Author Maria Konnikova took her Ph.D. in psychology to the poker table, and turned out to be good. So good, she went pro in poker, and learned all about her own biases on the way. We're talking about her new book "The Biggest Bluff: How I Learned to Pay Attention, Master Myself, and Win".
Now Playing: Radiolab

Uncounted
First things first: our very own Latif Nasser has an exciting new show on Netflix. He talks to Jad about the hidden forces of the world that connect us all. Then, with an eye on the upcoming election, we take a look back: at two pieces from More Perfect Season 3 about Constitutional amendments that determine who gets to vote. Former Radiolab producer Julia Longoria takes us to Washington, D.C. The capital is at the heart of our democracy, but it's not a state, and it wasn't until the 23rd Amendment that its people got the right to vote for president. But that still left DC without full representation in Congress; D.C. sends a "non-voting delegate" to the House. Julia profiles that delegate, Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton, and her unique approach to fighting for power in a virtually powerless role. Second, Radiolab producer Sarah Qari looks at a current fight to lower the US voting age to 16 that harkens back to the fight for the 26th Amendment in the 1960s. Eighteen-year-olds at the time argued that if they were old enough to be drafted to fight in the War, they were old enough to have a voice in our democracy. But what about today, when even younger Americans are finding themselves at the center of national political debates? Does it mean we should lower the voting age even further? This episode was reported and produced by Julia Longoria and Sarah Qari. Check out Latif Nasser's new Netflix show Connected here. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.