Nav: Home

Delivery strategies of chemotherapy to the central nervous system

March 09, 2016

The research thoroughly reviews the importance of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the blood-tumor barrier (BTB) along with the current status and future perspectives of interesting physical and surgical strategies to circumvent these central nervous system (CNS) barriers in the treatment of malignant brain tumors.

In this paper, the authors particularly focus on assessing the development of a selected number of strategies that enhance the distribution of therapeutic agents to the CNS in the context of neuro-oncology. This review is unique in the sense that it concentrates on surgical and physical delivery methods that are of present-day interest and in current development. The following strategies are discussed in this review: intra-arterial delivery, osmotic BBB disruption, intra-nasal delivery, convection-enhanced delivery, implanted polymers, magnetic microspheres and ultrasound BBB disruption. For each delivery method, un-biased and up to date information on the current technique, preclinical data and available clinical data is provided.

This detailed overview on the topic will raise great interest in the oncology community as it is shown to be a greatly prospering field of research. Finally, the authors also underline the importance of encouraging collaborations to allow greater progress in preclinical and clinical research with the overall goal to find ways to better impact patient outcomes and survival.
-end-


Bentham Science Publishers

Related Central Nervous System Articles:

Rare cells are 'window into the gut' for the nervous system
Specialized cells in the gut sense potentially noxious chemicals and trigger electrical impulses in nearby nerve fibers, according to a new study led by UC San Francisco scientists.
Zika virus persists in the central nervous system and lymph nodes of rhesus monkeys
Zika virus can persist in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), lymph nodes and colorectal tissue of infected rhesus monkeys for weeks after the virus has been cleared from blood, urine and mucosal secretions, according to a study published online in Cell.
Study overturns seminal research about the developing nervous system
New research by scientists at the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA overturns a long-standing paradigm about how axons grow during embryonic development.
As fins evolve to help fish swim, so does the nervous system
The sensory system in fish fins evolves in parallel to fin shape and mechanics, and is specifically tuned to work with the fish's swimming behavior, according to new research from the University of Chicago.
Antibodies as 'messengers' in the nervous system
Antibodies are able to activate human nerve cells within milliseconds and hence modify their function -- that is the surprising conclusion of a study carried out at Human Biology at the Technical University of Munich (TUM).
More Central Nervous System News and Central Nervous System Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Teaching For Better Humans
More than test scores or good grades — what do kids need to prepare them for the future? This hour, guest host Manoush Zomorodi and TED speakers explore how to help children grow into better humans, in and out of the classroom. Guests include educators Olympia Della Flora and Liz Kleinrock, psychologist Thomas Curran, and writer Jacqueline Woodson.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#535 Superior
Apologies for the delay getting this week's episode out! A technical glitch slowed us down, but all is once again well. This week, we look at the often troubling intertwining of science and race: its long history, its ability to persist even during periods of disrepute, and the current forms it takes as it resurfaces, leveraging the internet and nationalism to buoy itself. We speak with Angela Saini, independent journalist and author of the new book "Superior: The Return of Race Science", about where race science went and how it's coming back.