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OUP publishes free article collection about Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant disaster

March 09, 2016

March 11, 2016 marks five years since the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant disaster. In the last five years, researchers all over the world have been conducting substantial studies to find out the effect on the environment, human bodies, and our society. In honour of their great work, Oxford University Press (OUP) has made 30 research articles about the accident from nine journals freely available to read online for a year.

The virtual issue can be found here:

Example articles:
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Oxford University Press

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