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Providing contraceptive care in the pediatric emergency department

March 09, 2020

New Rochelle, NY, March 9, 2020--A new study found that two-thirds of female adolescents ages 16-21 seen in a pediatric Emergency Department (ED) were interested in discussing contraception, despite having a high rate of recent visits to a primary care provider. More than 22% indicated that they would be likely to start or change contraception during the ED visit. Is the ED a "Golden Opportunity" for contraceptive education and initiation, ask the authors of this study in Journal of Women's Health, a peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. Click here to read the full-text article on the Journal of Women's Health website through April 10, 2020.

The article entitled "Identifying a Golden Opportunity: Adolescent Interest in Contraceptive Initiation in a Pediatric Emergency Department" was coauthored by Colleen Gutman, MD and Atsuko Koyama, MD, MPH, Emory University, David Dorfman, MD and Patricia Kavanagh, MD, Boston University School of Medicine, and Halea Meese, University of Colorado School of Medicine.

Among the 381 women surveyed, 80.5% had been sexually active with a male partner and 28.2% had previously been pregnant. Thirty-nine percent of the women were currently using hormonal contraception, and 57.2 % were satisfied with their current method of contraception. Based on their findings, the researchers concluded that the ED provides an important opportunity to discuss and initiate effective contraception for young women.

The accompanying Editorial entitled "Contraception Provision in the Emergency Department: Are We Ready to Overcome the Obstacles?" details the challenges to providing contraceptive care in the ED, but concludes: "Despite these barriers, the benefits to providing contraception are undeniable." Obstacles include the variation in provider comfort with discussing contraceptive options, the training required for placing long-acting reversible contraception, such as implants, billing and insurance issues, and concerns related to parental and provider acceptance.

Editorial coauthors Kayleigh Fischer, MD, Washington University in Saint Louis School of Medicine, and Lauren Chernnick, MD, Columbia University Medical. Center, conclude, "If we can design novel ways to weave contraceptive provision in to the ED workflow, such as using technology or outside assistance such as health educators, we may be closer to finding the middle ground in which our female patients are receiving the evidence-based, patient-centered reproductive counseling they not only need but deserve."
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About the Journal

Journal of Women's Health published monthly, is a core multidisciplinary journal dedicated to the diseases and conditions that hold greater risk for or are more prevalent among women, as well as diseases that present differently in women. Led by Editor-in-Chief Susan G. Kornstein, MD, Executive Director of the Virginia Commonwealth University Institute for Women's Health, Richmond, VA, the Journal covers the latest advances and clinical applications of new diagnostic procedures and therapeutic protocols for the prevention and management of women's healthcare issues. Complete tables of content and a sample issue may be viewed on the Journal of Women's Health website. Journal of Women's Health is the official journal of the Academy of Women's Health and the Society for Women's Health Research.

About the Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including LGBT Health, Transgender Health, Population Health Management, and Breastfeeding Medicine. Its biotechnology trade magazine, GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 90 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

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