2004 Research in Dental Caries Award to Beighton

March 10, 2004

Honolulu, Hawaii...At the Opening Ceremonies of the 82nd General Session of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), convening here today, David Beighton, Professor of Oral Microbiology, Department of Oral Microbiology, Guy's King's and St Thomas' Dental Institute, London, England, received the 2004 Research in Dental Caries Award. Supported by Pfizer Inc., the award is designed to stimulate and recognize outstanding and innovative achievements that have contributed to the basic understanding of caries etiology and/or to the prevention of dental caries.

Dr. Beighton received his BSc and PhD degrees from the University of Melbourne, Australia, in 1972 and 1978, respectively. From there, he moved to positions at the Royal College of Surgeons of England, the London Hospital Medical College, and finally to his present Institute. The award has been made for his meritorious contributions to our understanding of the oral flora.

The IADR Research in Dental Caries Award consists of a cash prize and a plaque. It is one of 15 Distinguished Scientist Awards conferred annually by the IADR, representing the highest honor the IADR can bestow.
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