BIDMC's Harvey Goldman, MD, receives distinguished pathologist award

March 10, 2006

Harvey Goldman, M.D, vice chairman of the department of pathology at Beth Israel Deaconess Center (BIDMC) and an international leader in the field of anatomic pathology was presented with the 2006 Distinguished Pathologist Award from the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology (USCAP) during a ceremony at the organization's annual meeting held recently in Atlanta, Georgia.

Established by the USCAP for recognition of distinguished service in the development of the discipline of pathology, the prestigious honor is presented annually to the individual who has made long-lasting contributions to the field.

In a career spanning nearly 50 years, Goldman's contributions to the field of academic medicine have included distinguished service as senior pathologist of the former Beth Israel Hospital, and chairman of the departments of pathology at the former New England Deaconess Hospital and New England Baptist Hospital. Goldman assumed his current position as BIDMC's vice chairman of pathology following the merger of the former Beth Israel Hospital and New England Deaconess Hospital in 1996.

"Harvey Goldman is a national treasure," says Jeffrey Saffitz, MD, PhD, current chief of pathology at BIDMC. "He has had an extraordinary career as a pathologist and educator and in the process has touched the lives of so many people in so many positive ways. We are proud that the USCAP has recognized his contributions with the Distinguished Pathologist Award."

A popular professor and respected member of the Harvard Medical School (HMS) faculty for more than 40 years, Goldman continues to serve as HMS Professor of Pathology and Distinguished Scholar. Among many distinguished teaching awards, Goldman was the first instructor to be honored by HMS students themselves in the early 1970s and has continued to receive honors and recognition from recent classes.

Goldman's research in the field of gastrointestinal pathology has focused on inflammatory conditions of the esophagus, stomach and intestines. In the early 1980s Goldman published sentinel papers describing mucosal biopsies of the gut, and also served as a member of the team that developed the criteria and classification of colonic dysplasia that complicates inflammatory bowel disease.

A leader among his peers, Goldman has served as president of the New England Society of Pathologists, the Gastrointestinal Pathology Society and the U.S. and Canadian Academy of Pathology. He is the author of numerous academic texts related to the pathology and the mucosal biopsy of the gastrointestinal tract.
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Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center is a patient care, teaching and research affiliate of Harvard Medical School, and ranks fourth in National Institutes of Health funding amound independent hospitals nationwide. BIDMC is clinically affiliated with the Joslin Diabetes Center and is a research partner of Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center. BIDMC is the official hospital of the Boston Red Sox. For more information, visit www.bidmc.harvard.edu.

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

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